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Raw Diet For Golden Pup

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34 replies to this topic

#21
AnthonyE

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Wow!  Just fed him a chicken quarter and he loved it!  It was so cool to watch him eat and crunch through the bones.  Pretty amazing how a pup at the age of 13 months can do that.  I guess we've officially made the switch to raw.  I still am wondering if one quarter is enough to begin with? It doesn't account for the 2% of his body weight as an adult.  Should I increase it slowly to the 2% or just start right off the bat at 2%?



#22
Jordann

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I'm so happy he has taken to it so quickly! Puppies are normally very receptive to the new diet.

The quarters I feed are around a pound to a pound and a half. When the boys were switched over, I was feeding them one quarter a day, but twice a week they would get 2 quarters to get up to their needed amounts. They were 75ish pounds, they are now 70 and 68 pounds. You will work up to his ideal portioning.

He is 13 weeks, not months, right? He should eat 3 meals a day until he's about 6 months old. You will slowly add more food to his meals, until you get to his ideal portion. If you add too much at once, he can get diarrhea (over feeding causes this).

Keep us posted on his progress! :)

#23
AnthonyE

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I fed him twice today ... each time he had a chicken quarter.  He seems to love eating the chicken and is responding well.  However, he still seems hungry... should I be giving him more ... he looks a little thin.  Should I be increasing the amount each feeding or provide him with more snacks?  Also, is it okay to give him snacks such as duck feet, ox tail etc. in between meals?  Can I include some chicken backs and/or necks with the quarter? Thanks again for all your help.



#24
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Slowly increase the amount you're feeding him if he seems thin, but don't overdo it.

I would just increase meal sizes rather than giving snacks during the day.

#25
AnthonyE

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Tyson is loving his meals - chicken quarters.  Seems to go through them pretty quick - grinding them down with his teeth.  I've added a little bit of boneless chicken breast just to increase it a bit with muscle meat - is this okay?  I did notice today during our morning walk that his poop was a little runny - would it be good to give him chicken backs instead of a chicken quarter tonight for dinner?  I met some other dog owners today and they advised not to give him raw bones  - claimed that they have heard of other dogs intestine being punctured by the bones - I have to admit, it still makes me a little nervous when I hear such stories.  Is it possible for that to happen?  Would it be safer for me to grind down the bones and chicken - I know they sell it like this.  Do you recommend giving snacks such as duck feet, trachea etc. in between meals? 



#26
TRDmom

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Usually its cooked bones that present problems (splintering) and are in the horror stories, as well as bones that were an inappropriate size (e.g. weight bearing *huge* bones of a cow). Did these people feed raw themselves? At any point? Or was it a second-hand (or third, forth..) account? I ask because many people unfortunately do have misconceptions about raw. Somebody told my mother (who told them I fed my dog raw and was looking for deer meat) that deer was good, but could kill a dog if they got too much. I asked her if they offered an explanation as to why it would, but she said they did not. Sooo, I filed that comment in the bin of 'old wives' tales' and haven't changed a thing. I still want a deer!! LOL

 

When feeding raw, you might want to consider how wolves eat. I have watched many documentaries of wolves chasing down prey, eating prey alive (they were eating the back-end of a buffalo while she was still alive and trying to get away from them!), gorging themselves, going hungry, eating healthy animals, eating sick animals, eating large large buffalo to small fish... so far researchers have not included footage of them being hurt by their food--unless it was a hoof or horn being defensively swung at them. While acknowledge there is a chance of something 'going wrong,' the likelihood appears very thin. Personally, I know of more dogs who were made sick and even died from pet food (kibble) vs. raw fed (currently none). 



#27
TRDmom

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Forgot to ask, how many meals per day is he getting? Three meal-times are best for his age. Pups seem to have an endless stomach at times! It is also a puppy behavior (instinct) to beg for food from their parents and other pack members. Use your judgment about how much he is getting and whether its enough. Body size at this age should be a little chubby. As an adult, he should be lean, but bones should not be showing (e.g. hips, back, multiple ribs). There is nothing innately wrong with snacks (I know he would love getting duck feet or ox tail!!), but if you're still house-training, irregular feeding times correlate with irregular potty times. Overfeeding can also produce stomach upset.



#28
TRDmom

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This post might be of interest to you regarding physical changes some dogs go through when transitioning to a raw meat diet. http://preymodelraw....ry-through-raw/



#29
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People have been feeding a raw meaty bone diet for milennia without problems. People who dont understand a raw diet will have serious reservations about it- I did too in the beginning. But once I saw how beneficial it was to my dogs' health, all of my worries dissolved.

Increasing the muscle meat at this point is a good thing. Just feed a bit more bone if you do.

#30
AnthonyE

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While I was shopping for more 'raw' food - chicken quarters and backs, I noticed fresh pig feet and ears.  Is it okay to include that in the raw diet after the transition period?  What does that account for - muscle, bone, organ or none of the required part of the diet?  There was also beef heart, gizzards, cow tongue etc. Are these good things to include in the diet later? 

 

Tyson has been doing great on the chicken backs as well.  I've been alternating between quarters and backs/necks.  We are going to be introducing turkey backs/necks this week.  Is there enough muscle meat on turkey necks/backs?  Should I be including more muscle meat?  Are turkey drumsticks soft enough for a puppy to break down?  Sorry, this may have been posted in the getting started forum but I just want to make sure. 

 

Thanks again for all your help. 



#31
AnthonyE

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I forgot to ask something in the post above. Tonight when he was eating a chicken quarter he seem swallow a large chunk (what looked like a drumstick).  Will it break down when digesting?  How will something larger move through the intestine?  Will he pass larger bones as one whole piece?  I hope this will not pose a health risk - sorry if this seems paranoid.



#32
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Stay away from pig feet.

The rest are fine. Kidney, liver, spleen, and pancreas are all organ meats. The rest are considered muscle meats.

You want plenty of bone in the beginning to prevent loose stool. Once they're doing good on high bone content you can start to add more muscle meat in. Generally you'll want it to even out to feeding mostly muscle meat, some organ and some bone. Exact percentages are not that important.

Yes, whole bones will digest. My dogs chomp a chicken quarter a few times bad swallow the rest whole.

#33
Jordann

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My guys will *maybe* chomp chicken necks once or twice before swallowing them, and their poops always show everything was digested beautifully. :)
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#34
AnthonyE

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Hi again, just wondering how to know what percentage of muscle meat vs. bone am I giving if I mainly feed him chicken quarters, backs, and necks?  Is there a danger if he has too much bone?  We are in our 3rd week of raw and he has been eating chicken and turkey and seems to be doing fine.



#35
TRDmom

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Since you say he's doing fine, you are probably offering the right amounts. He should be able to poop without straining or having diarrhea. Too much bone and he will get constipated.






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