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Puppies And Bones On The Pmr

puppies bones puppy

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10 replies to this topic

#1
The Skaven

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Hi All! I'm Michael - have been lurking for some time but only signed up today.

 

For the last several months I've been reading endlessly about the PMR - all in anticipation of our new Rottweiler puppy arriving this week. I've started him out and so far so good. He's devoured every plate put in front of him.

 

The one piece of information that seems to be lacking everywhere is information specifically about puppies and bones. For the bone portion of the meals, we've been using chicken bones and cartilage from the neck area and back. He eats them, but it's a struggle. We've cut them down into small pieces to make them more manageable. 

 

I'm afraid that he's going to choke. Hasn't happened yet but I'm worried that he will. 

 

Can a fellow dog-lover help me out on how you approach bones in a puppy PMR diet? What kinds of bones do you use? Do you grind them down - if so, how small? How thin to they need to be? The puppy is young - 2 months old.

 

Edit: also as a part of my question, most sources indicate that edible bone should be 10% to 15% of the diet. However other sources say "Raw meaty bones should comprise around 30 to 50 percent of the diet". Can you kind folks help me understand - that's a big difference. Perhaps the latter includes the meat on the bones?

 

I'm dying for some good information - hold my heart in my hand every time he eats.

 

Thank you!


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#2
naturalfeddogs

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First of all, welcome! And congrats on your new puppy! 

 

For abou the first two weeks, feed only bone in chicken, like you are doing. You can feed quarters, backs, or drumsticks. Don't cut them into smaller pieces. The smaller the pieces, the more chance for swallowing them whole, which could cause choking,  AND having oddly shaped bones. You want larger pieces of meat so he will have to chew. If you want, you can help him get started chewing the bones by using a kitchen mallet or hammer and pound them a little. 

 

Don't stress over percentages, even for a puppy. The percentages are really just guidelines. I have never used them. Let the puppy's body condition and poops tell you whether to increase or back off the amount you feed. Remember a puppy needs to eat more than an adult, as in three times a day for a while. Otherwise, they eat all the same proteins as adults. 


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#3
The Skaven

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Thank you! So it looks like I've made a mistake in cutting up the bones into small portions. He's such a tiny guy - supposedly two months but I think he's really 5 weeks (breeder wasn't reputable - long story), hard to believe he can attack it but I am going to give it a try and report. 

 

Thank you again!


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#4
naturalfeddogs

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Sounds good! Keep us posted!


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#5
The Skaven

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Sounds good! Keep us posted!

 

So I'm not having any luck - any advice is appreciated. I tried giving the pup a drumstick and a chicken wing. The drumstick was a not starter but the chicken wing he almost got. He tried for about 20 minutes. Cutting off the skin helped but he struggled and struggled.

 

I tried hammering one of the wings but it didn't seem to help.

 

I believe the breeder might have lied about the age. If we instead assume he's 5 weeks instead of 8, can anyone recommend the best approach? Honestly, things are going great minus getting down bones and I'm really worried. 

 

Thank you!!


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#6
DobeLoveX2

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I am new here and just started a few days ago. I don't have any advice or wisdom but I just wanted to let you know that I had trouble getting my 2 year old dobe to eat raw for the first 3 days. It was so stressful! Hang in there!

#7
naturalfeddogs

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So I'm not having any luck - any advice is appreciated. I tried giving the pup a drumstick and a chicken wing. The drumstick was a not starter but the chicken wing he almost got. He tried for about 20 minutes. Cutting off the skin helped but he struggled and struggled.

 

I tried hammering one of the wings but it didn't seem to help.

 

I believe the breeder might have lied about the age. If we instead assume he's 5 weeks instead of 8, can anyone recommend the best approach? Honestly, things are going great minus getting down bones and I'm really worried. 

 

Thank you!!

Try smashing a chicken neck  and see how that goes. Maybe smash it REALLY good. They are much easier to chew. Keep trying, it sounds like he is working on getting it. There are breeders who wean whole litters onto raw, so even if he is actually 5 weeks instead of 8, he can still do it. What you may want to do in the meantime as well, is look into a grinder that can grind small bones like chicken necks. 



#8
The Skaven

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Thank you both. He's trying and he wants to eat it. He'll eat all the meat around the bones. He'll put the bones in his mouth and chew and chew and chew, then eventually spit them out. 

 

The pup is a Rottweiler and for a little guy he has some sharp teeth (though still the baby teeth obviously). It seems like he should be able to do it but just doesn't know how? 

 

I've got the chicken necks lined up for lunch, let's see how he does. If he can't eat the bones I think I might need an alternate strategy - perhaps kibble until 10 weeks and try again.



#9
naturalfeddogs

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He probabaly doesn't know how just yet. Smash them with a hammer or mallet good, and that should help, especially with the necks.



#10
Iorveth

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I would find a grinder and help him out that way for a few weeks if he really is younger than 8 weeks. At 8 weeks, he will be big and strong enough to handle most chicken bones. I got my Bluetick Coonhound at 8 weeks and one day and he was a powerhouse of an eater. It's hard to believe that something so small can chomp through bones like he could. He only ended up around 70-75 lbs so he's not as big of a dog as your Rottie might end up being. My youngest, a Standard Xoloitzcuintli who only topped out at 60 lbs, was 10 weeks when he came to us and also had no issue going through bone. Puppies deserve more credit than most people give them. They're tough!

If he really is only 5 weeks, I would definitely help by smashing chicken necks really good with a mallet like naturalfeddogs suggested and I would be looking at grinders. He shouldn't need you to grind it for very long but, if he is that young, he still has a ton of growing and changing to do before he's the 8 week old puppy most people take home. And let me tell you, grinders are incredibly useful. My dogs HATE kidney and I grind up their boneless meals for the week (usually beef and pork) and mix in their fish oil, their fish, their coconut oil and all the other little extras they get and all that gets mixed with the ground kidney and the suckers have no idea they're eating the one thing they won't touch if offered to them. Grinders are also great for the event you have a sick dog who just doesn't want to put the effort into eating something whole. You can convince them much better with ground meat. Thankfully, getting sick is an extreme rarity but being able to grind meat makes things much easier. If you were to invest in a grinder now, you'll find tons of uses for it later even though you don't have to grind for your pup anymore.



#11
cpboyers

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I started my 4mo old GSD with chicken quarters and wings. No problem at all. I prefer those because the bones are smaller and easier for them to crush. Once he figures out that it's really a chew toy than anything else he'll love it I'm sure. I have to agree with the smashing if he is a little unsure at first. It sounds like he's getting the idea so just give it some time. If you are comfortable holding it while he chews that might help too. He probably hasn't gotten the "death to chicken" idea yet
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