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Herbal Remedies For Inflammation

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4 replies to this topic

#1
Britt0325

Britt0325

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I've been doing some reading about different herbs like ginger and turmeric. Apparently they're really good for reducing inflammation as well as just generally being very good for both people and dogs. Full of antioxidants and just over all very beneficial.

I've also been reading about inflammation and how many health problems are associated with it.

So, I'm thinking about either looking for a supplement that contains ginger, turmeric, and any other herbs that are known for reducing inflammation and containing antioxidants or possibly making my own if I can't find a product that has what I'm looking for.

I know that there a some people on this forum who are more experienced with herbs so I was hoping someone could recommend a supplement that has what I'm looking for. Or, possibly, give me some ideas as to what other herbs are really beneficial and good for reducing inflammation.

If I have to make my own product I'll probably make up a big mixture of different herbs including the turmeric and ginger and give my dog about a fourth of a tsp a day on a periodic basis. So I'm not going to want to use anything that could have any over dose limit or negative effects. Only positive effects. Preferably herbs that are known for being high in antioxidants and good for reducing inflammation.

With that in mind, I am somewhat worried about the fact that giving too much ginger can cause stomach upset and diarrhea. Over all, I don't see any information about it being dangerous but, like most things, too much can cause stomach upset. I can't find any information about dosage though. My dog is 15lbs. So, if someone with more experience with herbs can give me a dosage that would be great.

Over all, if I do make my own mixture, would a mixture of herbs such as ginger, turmeric, and whatever else giving at a fourth of a tsp to a 15lb dog, once a day, likely to cause stomach upset?
  • OctavioMype likes this

#2
Swinn

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Hi Britto325,

 

I think it is great that you are considering giving anti-inflammatory herbs etc but it's actually better to avoid the things that cause the inflammation to begin with when able.  If not able or if you are wanting extra protection --- turmeric is good but I'd get my own as many spices are irradiated.  By purchasing only organic turmeric you know that it has not been irradiated and will have all the therapeutic benefits.  I like supplements/herbs that have multiple benefits.  With that in mind I like the following - I like spirulina (which is a "blood builder", and excellent protein source, anti-inflammatory, plus).  Pineapple (if given away from meals) has an enzyme called bromelain and bromelain has been studied to help the inflammation of arthritis suffers.  If enzymes, or enzyme rich foods like raw green tripe or pancreas, are given then the body doesn't need to use the amino acids from protein eaten to make digestive enzymes.  These amino acids are then available for the body to use elsewhere "Amino acid supplementation reduced inflammation and soreness. The amino acids likely decreased cytokines--inflammatory chemicals released by the immune system."  http://www.livestron...ry-amino-acids/

 

Black cherries when in season can be given as treats (seed removed of course).  They have been shown to also help with arthritis and gout by reducing inflammation (as well as neutralizing uric acid). 

 

Raw honey should be in every medicine cabinet.  When applied topically to a wound it produces hydrogen peroxide and keeps the wound clean.  It also causes new blood vessels (angiogenesis) to grow to the wound.  Raw honey has been shown to heal deep, nasty wounds with minimal to no scar tissue.  I recently used raw honey on a silver dollar sized flesh wound my Pom got.  Healed the nasty looking surface wound within 10 days with no scarring -- hair grew back and you'd never know there was a wound there.  Raw honey is anti-inflammatory when taken internally and also is anti-microbial.  Good to give in case of bronchial issues -- like kennel cough.  Obviously would want to give internally in small amounts off and on.

 

Organic extra virgin coconut oil is a powerful antimicrobial as well as anti-inflammatory.  CO is excellent for soothing irritated eyes..  It can be applied directly to the eye and can be used to treat conjunctivitis or allergy symptoms that manifest in the eyes -- I've used it myself and on my grand kids.  It is primarily absorbed in the upper portion of the stomach and therefore safer for dogs needing a lower fat diet due to pancreatitis.  Also kills candida yeast so handy to have on hand if our dogs or ourselves need to be put on antibiotics for any reason.

 

Raw freshly grated or chopped garlic is anti-inflammatory, fights cancer, is a prebiotic food for probiotics, extremely anti-microbial, demonstrated in vitro to kill heartworm larvae etc.  Only small amounts should be fed with breaks in between feeding and should not be fed if pup has issues with anemia or might be going in for surgery.  Also Dr. Jean Dodds recommends avoid using garlic in dogs of Japanese descent.  Not sure why but I trust Dr. Dodds... :)

 

There are lots more herbs and foods that have anti-inflammatory effects.  Rather than giving just one or two or three it seems that things work best synergistically...  So mix it up and give a wide variety of herbs and foods...  That way you don't have to worry about over supplementing any one item either.  Just a thought...  Hope the info is helpful!!!


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#3
Britt0325

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It was extremely helpful thank you :)

At this point I've become really interested in natural health, herbs, and just over all healthy living. Reading all this information about inflammation and how it's associated with heart disease, cancer, and pretty much any other horrible disease you could think of may have made me a little paranoid lol. Over all, I'm just looking for the healthiest things that I can add to my dogs diet and that will benefit him as he ages and keep him healthy. So your post was extremely helpful for that.

He's 8 now, not really a senior... More like middle aged for a mini poodle, so I want too keep him healthy as he ages and prevent the onset of disease and things like arthritis.

I do give him spirulina two weeks out of the month. He also gets milk thistle and SAMe one week out of the month (he previously had liver and gallbladder issues, which has thankfully gotten completely better and blood work is perfect now for over a year.) Also he occasionally gets coconut oil although I prefer krill oil on a daily basis.

I just have a couple questions,

Is manuka honey really all they say it is or would any raw honey be good?

What's the best dosage for garlic for a 15lb dog?

Do you know anything about red palm oil? I just found out about it last night, never even heard of it before. Apparently it's supposed to be really good for you. Fight inflammation and full of antioxidants. I'm just concerned because I really can't find much information about it for dogs and it's an oil. I've learned to be really suspicious of oils because a lot of them are horrible for over all health.

The only oils I feel comfortable using for cooking or anything is olive oil and coconut oil. So I would love to hear your opinion on this red palm oil stuff.
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#4
Swinn

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Unfortunately my knowledge of red palm oil is limited.  What I do know, like coconut oil it is the only oil (besides butter and lard) that is safe for high heat cooking.  And it is a natural and excellent source of a specific form of vitamin E.  There are eight forms of vitamin E -- alpha, beta, delta and gamma tocopherol and alpha, beta, delta and gamma tocotrienol.  Most whole foods have a variety of the different kinds but red palm oil is the only one I know of that has all four forms of tocotrienols -- let alone in any measurable amount.  Science has discovered that it is the tocotrienols that are the primary cancer fighters of the E family. 

 

That's not enough data so googled it and found info from N.D. Bruce Fife..  In my opinion a trusted source.  Dr. Fife refers to red pam oil as a powerhouse of nutrients and based on what he writes it is one..  But there was one thing that concerned me about what he wrote.  He mentions that it is an excellent source of carotenes which the body converts to vitamin A...   http://www.coconutre...ed palm oil.htm   We give liver at only 5% of the diet so as not to give excess vitamin A.  Would rpo in an already liver supplemented diet cause an A overdose?  Another google search and the pet food project website says beta carotene is only converted to A when it is needed..  http://www.dogfoodpr...p?page=vitamins  If that is correct than I personally don't see any issues with using rpo in moderation in the diet of our pups..  To be safe though, I might give it with meals/days that I don't include liver.

 

One more thing to consider ---- some holistic practitioners feel that the body can not "overdose" on natural nutrients..  This makes sense to me but I still proceed with caution..  I do think I'm going to start adding small amounts of rpo to my and my dogs' diets for the vitamin E at the very least..  It's not always easy to get vitamin E (especially all forms) in a naturally fed dog...

 

Thanks for bringing up red palm oil and please do let me know if you find anything else out about it..

 

Manuka honey has the most antibacterial (possibly antimicrobial) benefits of all honeys tested.  BUT, all "raw" honeys are going to be antibacterial and promote wound healing.  The less processed the more medicinal.  On a side note, locally sourced raw honeys can benefit those suffering from environmental allergies..

 

Most of the vets that recommend garlic suggest about 1/2 clove for a 15 pound dog.  I think if fed regularly 1/4 clove is enough though.  A trick to keep the garlic fresh -- I buy the already pealed stuff (from Trader Joes) and then open up one package and put them in a small jar and cover them with olive oil.  I then take out what I want to feed and grate that with a fine chocolate grater (the finer the grating or chopping the more the benefit).  What is left over I put back in the jar of olive oil whole and then use the next day.  Once all the cloves have been used the oil can be used as a garlic infused cooking oil or salad dressing.  yum :)

 

Milk thistle, or the active ingredient silymarin, is good for the liver because it helps boost glutathione levels.  Glutathione is the "master antioxidant" of the body.  Garlic also helps boost glutathione.  The attached article written by a medical doctor has some REALLY GOOD info on glutathione but one thing he doesn't mention is --- raw, unprocessed egg whites and raw, non-homogenized milk are two excellent whole food precursors to glutathione. http://www.huffingto...f_b_530494.html   (Egg whites should always be fed with the yolk if fed raw or they can cause a biotin deficiency)



#5
Britt0325

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Thank you so much, all this information has been really helpful.

I think, based off the information I've read and what you've told me, that I might have to get myself some red palm oil. Probably a lot better for cooking things that I don't want to taste like coconut lol. Knowing that there doesn't seem to be any real dangers to it, I'll probably give it periodically to my dog. Just to add a little variety.

I've read about vitamin overdoses quite a bit because spirulina also has carotenoids and a good amount of beta carotene. So, I had worried about a vitamin A overdose with that. From what I found, there had never been a vitamin overdose from any food source. Every overdose has always been caused by synthetic vitamins. So I was extremely relieved to hear that.

I still wouldn't want to feed too much of something or too many things at once though so I'll probably avoid giving spirulina and red palm oil at the same time. Both are supposed to be extremely high in carotenes so I wouldn't want to overdo it with that.

That was part of what interested me in the oil though. I've been trying to find out how much alpha carotene it has for all the health benefits it has. I'm wondering if it might be a better source then pumpkin and carrots. Might be easier to digest for a dog since it's a fat instead of a whole vegetable.

Thanks for the tip about keeping garlic fresh, I'm going to have to start doing that. For some reason I can never get through a whole bulb. Should probably start eating it more honestly...I just never think to cook with it unless I'm cooking Italian food lol.




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