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My Rhodesian Ridgeback Hattie


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#1
Baynyn

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Hi everyone, glad to be here.  By way of introduction, my name's Tyler and my girl is Hattie.  She's a 4 month-old Rhodesian Ridgeback pup and yesterday we started PMR after I'd been reading about it and slowly stocking up on meat deals that I can find.  After picking her up from the breeder I bought one bag of the dry dog food she was on (Diamond Natural, don't know how good its quality is) and said that it would be the only bag I bought for her.  As I looked into diets for her I was quickly convinced that raw was the way to go.  Because she's still so young I'm hoping that she transitions easily.  Two days in so far so good.

 

I may try to introduce liver to her pretty soon before she has a chance to get picky, and if she seems to be doing fine with chicken I may try mixing in some pork after a few days rather than waiting.  Aside from giving me a slightly confused "What is this friggin awesomeness you're doing here?" look, she's handling it great.  She's not gulping, bolting, vomiting, or hoarding.  She has even started to lie down when she eats the last couple of meals, which I like to see.  Her stools have stayed firm but not overly so, even though the bone content of the chicken thighs and drumsticks that she's been getting for the past two days is slightly higher than what's recommended.

 

My biggest concerns are finding affordable, sustainable sources of meat, but I'm getting a lot of good ideas to try on here.  I've had good responses when I've called meat wholesalers as far as saying that they frequently get meat that is returned from their customers because of torn packaging or freezer burn and that they'd sell it for next to nothing because otherwise they'd just toss it, but despite that I still haven't gotten any calls.  It's a little disappointing.  But I'll try some processors and ask about scraps, that sounds promising.

 

I'm excited about doing this, and it is a lot of fun to watch.  I'm glad that there is an active community to help with questions and support.

 

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#2
TRDmom

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Welcome! She's a cutie! :) My boy is commonly mistaken for a Rhodesian (he's a Thai).

 

Sounds like you're doing well with feedings. I don't see anything wrong with adding other meats and liver sooner. You may want to stick with one or two proteins per day starting out (e.g. chicken today, beef tomorrow; or chicken in the morning, beef in the afternoon and evening; or chicken with beef liver). I still usually do that myself.

 

I can find chicken quarters (leg and thigh) on sale for $0.49/lb maybe a few times a year (they probably have it more, but I haven't paid attention). If you have an actual butcher at the grocery store, they can order items for you and offer a better price for larger orders (vs. the packaged items they regularly sell). In my immediate area, there really are no dedicated butcher's shops. Only one chain of grocery stores even has an actual butcher/meat department that can do ordering.

 

I found a good meat source through Craigslist and also through a local raw feeders yahoo group. You could also check with your local laws/Fish and Wildlife as to their policy on roadkill. A freshly hit deer shouldn't go to waste. ;) I've started raising some of our own meat animals. Rabbits are easy enough to care for and process.

 

Good luck!



#3
Baynyn

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That's a good looking Thai!

 

I added in the liver on about day 3.  I was going to do a half serving, but she grabbed the rest of it off of the counter.  SO not only did she get a whole day's worth of liver unexpectedly, but it was also the day I discovered that she is big enough to counter surf, lol.  One of her next stools was pretty runny, so I halved the liver and it firmed right back up.  Over the next few days I increased it until she's back on a full serving with no issues again.  So as it currently stands she is handling about 75-80% chicken meat, 15-20% bone, and 5% liver like a champ.

 

I've got some pork butt that I'll start her on this week as her second meat.  It has a much lower bone content, so I'll alternate feedings or days with the chicken to keep it consistent.  Or I may pick up some cheap ribs somewhere with some higher bone content than the butt, which I think is pretty low.

 

She's doing awesome and adjusting much faster than I had expected.  It's probably because she's still so young and hasn't been on kibble that long, but I've got absolutely no reason to complain at all so far.

 

Is there anything that I should look out for as far as anything I may be missing?  I know that once she's up on a minimum of three proteins, bone, liver, and other organs in the appropriate ratios that that it should take care of itself, but I just want to make sure.  Watch her stools, behavior, appearance, etc... take note of any changes and adjust accordingly, right?

 

This site is great!


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#4
naturalfeddogs

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Welcome! As long as Hattie is doing well on redmeats and liver so soon, it will probably be OK. Just keep an eye on poops, to he sure no digestive issues come up. Some dogs handle that well so soon, others not so much. 



#5
TRDmom

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That's a good looking Thai!

 

I added in the liver on about day 3.  I was going to do a half serving, but she grabbed the rest of it off of the counter.  SO not only did she get a whole day's worth of liver unexpectedly, but it was also the day I discovered that she is big enough to counter surf, lol.  One of her next stools was pretty runny, so I halved the liver and it firmed right back up.  Over the next few days I increased it until she's back on a full serving with no issues again.  So as it currently stands she is handling about 75-80% chicken meat, 15-20% bone, and 5% liver like a champ.

 

I've got some pork butt that I'll start her on this week as her second meat.  It has a much lower bone content, so I'll alternate feedings or days with the chicken to keep it consistent.  Or I may pick up some cheap ribs somewhere with some higher bone content than the butt, which I think is pretty low.

 

She's doing awesome and adjusting much faster than I had expected.  It's probably because she's still so young and hasn't been on kibble that long, but I've got absolutely no reason to complain at all so far.

 

Is there anything that I should look out for as far as anything I may be missing?  I know that once she's up on a minimum of three proteins, bone, liver, and other organs in the appropriate ratios that that it should take care of itself, but I just want to make sure.  Watch her stools, behavior, appearance, etc... take note of any changes and adjust accordingly, right?

 

This site is great!

 

 

Sounds like you're on the right track! :) Its nice that she took to liver like that! My current boy is picky and has to have frozen liver or else he won't eat it (my other dogs could have cared less).

 

Bony meats should be offset with something boneless (e.g. muscle meat or organ), and vice versa. Overfeeding should also be avoided as it can cause diarrhea. Fat is a good source of energy, so don't be afraid to offer it (perhaps in small amounts at first to see how she handles it).

 

Yes, keep an eye on her stool/behavior/appearance. Stools may appear dehydrated compared to kibble-fed dogs, but it shouldn't be real chalky or appear painful when she defecates. Behavior should be active, cheerful puppy. Appearance should show her frame easily, but not bony. Coat should also be glossy/healthy. 






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