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Blood Test Results...


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39 replies to this topic

#1
jagger

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Had a blood test done 6 months ago I believe, clean across the board according to the vet - but I didn't get a copy of it. Second blood test came back and there's a few anomolies, have the print out in my hand. Need some opinions from people that have some knowledge behind the raw feeding.

 

Everything else but these are mid range normal, i'll leave them all out.

 

Lymphocytes (LYM) and monocytes (MONO) are low normal.

Mean platelet volume (MPV) is low (just below normal) @ 8.4

Platelet Distribution Width (PDW) is 9.6 (low normal)

Globulin (GLOB) is low normal

ALKP is low normal

GGT is low normal

 

AMYL (amylase) is low - he's running 408 and should be between 500 and 1500. Now amylase is required to break down starch and sugar is it not? he wouldn't be getting much of each. Low amylase could possibly indicate a pancreas or kidney issue.

 

Just noticed, his TT4 is borderline - he's 13, could very well be hypothyroid which would explain everything.

 

For others that have the blood tests done, would there be anything missing in his diet that can cause these readings?


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#2
jagger

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Bear in mind that 6 months ago (or longer) I had requested from a vet to do a hypothyroid test as it explains the vast majority of symptoms - she brushed it off and said here, have some allergy pills. If this dog is hypothyroid, i'm going to lose it. Jagger's TT4 is 13. The vet said his thyroxin levels are fine.

 

From the lab that did the blood test.

 

https://www.idexx.co...sting-guide.pdf

 

 

edit: it was in May I had asked for the test. http://preymodelraw....y-meds/?p=11111



#3
jagger

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Got his last blood test results this morning - from December last year shortly after he started raw. Everything was normal but the T4 was not done, so we have no baseline.

 

Appointment is tomorrow morning - told the GF if there's no common sense (or mention of food trial) thrown at this within 10 minutes, i'm off to a holistic vet.



#4
naturalfeddogs

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Let us know how it goes!



#5
jagger

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$328 later and blood is drawn, had to push for it. He's going to check the thyroid "against his better judgement". But wanted to do a biopsy and put him on steroids and allergy meds. FML. What part of "It's my money, do the test" do vets not get? Just want it rule out the thyroid before throwing anything else at him. All about allergies again...

 

Should have the results back in a few days.



#6
TRDmom

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Hoping for conclusive results for you guys!

 

FYI - its not just vets being bullheaded about things, but human doctors too. I had a similar conversation with someone recently. :(



#7
jagger

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Now I have to wonder...

 

Research into HYPERthyroid dogs, while rare, generally happens when the animal ingests too much gullet of beef or commercial patties and such containing thyroid meat... I wonder if it could be used to try to boost his thyroxine levels...?



#8
TRDmom

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I thought thyroid issues were largely due to chemical imbalances? Of course my limited experience is with people.



#9
jagger

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From what I'm researching, by the time hypothyroid symptoms start to show, the thyroid is already 70% damaged. It can be autoimmune, it can be diet related etc. Treatment is generally the same. Some are feeding kelp, some are feeding dried thyroid, I'm going to make a few phone calls today to see if I can dig some up. His levels are already low, it's not going to hurt him.

 

I don't know for sure if the dog is hypo or something else is inhibiting his thyroxine levels but we shall find out soon. I hope he is honestly, at least it can be treated - but if nothing else - it's ruled out. I won't allow a vet to toss steroids and such at him until the thyroid is ruled out. According to the vet, dogs are overdiagnosed with hypothyroidism and seems to be one of the reasons he didn't want to chase it.



#10
jagger

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Spoke with a holistic vet tech this morning at a new clinic, and it was a good talk, seemed very knowledgeable for a tech. When the test results come back, we are going to bring him in and let them have a go. They are 110% for raw feeding and really understand it.

 

Right now, we're about as far left as we can go with western medicine - she was talking about taking him to the far right in eastern medicine. Whoa, just meet me in the middle with some common sense, lets get this dog on the path to wellness first then we can talk turkey. She's cool with that, we have choices when it comes to western, eastern or somewhere in between.

 

I explained a quick history, symptoms, told her about the last blood test and that we had to demand a follow up on his thyroid. She looked at me in disbelief. I think I like her already. I'm on the hunt for some raw thyroid, it's ok in small amounts. Starting to feel a little better overall, hopefully he will soon too.


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#11
TRDmom

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Thanks for the update. It looks like things are going the right way! I hope your guy is able to get some help/relief soon!!



#12
naturalfeddogs

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That sounds positive! Let us know how it goes with them once you have been there.



#13
jagger

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Well, bought a whole chicken a couple of days ago, head/feet and all. Dug out the thyroid and fed it to him, not much to it, couple of tiny pieces of meat. It's weird, itching and chewing has subsided quite a bit on his body, can a little bit of thyroxine act that fast? But he's still scratching his ears. Started using mometamax, ears stink and are red deep down, probably another ear infection. Guess the vet didn't check his ears.

 

And a warning to all:

 

For those that are feeding alot of necks (chicken, turkey, beef etc), you might want to do some research into thyroxine seepage and the symptoms of possible hyperthyroid in your raw fed animals. It's possible that the extra thyroxine can drive up the levels - it's proven.

 

The thyroid is an interesting little gland.



#14
naturalfeddogs

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Quite honestly, in going into my 10th year of feeding raw, I have never heard of this problem being related to feeding necks. 



#15
jagger

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I think it's more for people feeding lots of neck meat and bone...

 

And it's just a suggestion, research is always good.

 

 

As for an update, he's scratching very little this evening. Seems to be more alert.



#16
jagger

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Here's a few pictures, one side rear quarter only. The rest of him is like this. The white you see in the pics is skin, goes to show how much of a moth eaten appearance he has. The wet spot is just a bit of coconut, starting to use it on his skin again. He's been chewing so much that he's creating lesions on different parts of his body.

 

alopecia1_zps7f7gokdj.jpg

 

 

alopecia3_zpsq0xtxs2u.jpg

 

 

alopecia2_zpsii36tk3s.jpg



#17
jagger

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He's been hit and miss with food the last couple of weeks, didn't eat all day yesterday when offered then scarfed some sirloin at 10 last night. He had a poop last night finally after nearly a day and a half, came out thick - like glue. And we noticed he hasn't been drinking a whole lot of water.

 

Boiled down a whole chicken this morning in straight water. Fed him a couple of ounces of boiled chicken breast and a cup of broth. Just want to give his GI a chance to relax I guess. Have a gallon of broth in the fridge with fat removed, it's got a very mild chicken flavor. He loves it, might be a good replacement for water for a while, enforce hydration so to speak. Scratching is very minimal now.

 

I think i'll take a chance and feed another thyroid today. It's been near 3 days since he had the first one - positive results so far.


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#18
TRDmom

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I appreciate these updates. Its an interesting read and good documentation for others experiencing similar issues. Is it possible to post a picture of the thyroid you're feeding? I'm curious to see it.



#19
Spy Car

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AMYL (amylase) is low - he's running 408 and should be between 500 and 1500. Now amylase is required to break down starch and sugar is it not? he wouldn't be getting much of each. Low amylase could possibly indicate a pancreas or kidney issue.

 

 

 

 

Since amylase is produced by the pancreas in response to ingesting starch/carbohydrates, wouldn't it be expected that a dog fed a diet that excludes carbs had low amylase levels?

 

Is this unusual for a raw fed dog?

 

All the best finding the heath answers with your dog.

 

Bill



#20
jagger

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I appreciate these updates. Its an interesting read and good documentation for others experiencing similar issues. Is it possible to post a picture of the thyroid you're feeding? I'm curious to see it.

 

Already been fed... Two tiny organs on either side of the neck. You probably won't find it on a typical chicken neck, have to buy the whole chicken with head and skin to get one. Even then I had to hunt through the bin, they all had their throats cut (typical) and many of the chickens had no neck skin.

 

I'm going to do a writeup at some point, try to detail everything we have gone through with this poor dog, hopefully it may help someone else.






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