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Raw Feeding Cane Corso Pup

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3 replies to this topic

#1
NicoTheCaneCorso

NicoTheCaneCorso

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Hello all, we have a 4 month old, soon to be 5 month old cane corso. We feed him royal canin, but are wanting to start raw. Any tips or advice on how to start, how much to feed, and what to feed would be greatly appreciated! TIA!

#2
TRDmom

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Welcome! Have you checked out the "Getting Started" page? Some good suggestions are compiled on it. http://preymodelraw....el-raw-diet-r19

 

Here's something I wrote to another person recently:

 

All I can advise is, at least three meats in her rotation--but more is better. Red meats are also supposed to be more nutritious, but honestly I'm not sure how much more that is. Currently, my freezers have turkey, chicken, and deer (we also have duck and fish, but they need processed before feeding and I've been lazy...).

 

Make sure to give liver at around 5% of diet (either feed weekly or daily). I usually offer beef liver. Chicken is readily available at most grocery stores and cheap--good for when you need some quickly. Rabbit, deer, turkey and duck liver are available to us occasionally throughout the year.

 

Chicken feet (and duck, if you can find them) are a good source of glucosamine and chondroitin (for joint health).

 

For conventionally raised meat (like you get at the grocery store), offer some salmon oil or oily fish (e.g. mackerel) to the diet for omega-3 fatty acid to help balance the omega-6. Too much omega-6 in the diet can cause inflammation, hence the need to balance it. My dog doesn't like fish, so I pump some salmon oil over his food when necessary. Grass-fed meat animals have a better omega-3/omega-6 ratio which shouldn't require supplementation. I love being able to get grass-fed (usually the occasional goat or deer)! :)

 

That being said---where I'm from, most dogs are fed butcher's scraps and "leftovers"--they usually are in better shape than most dogs I've seen in the U.S. Its crazy to think of all the money being spent on 5-star kibble and vet care (i.e. dental cleanings) here, when in other countries people give minimal care and their dogs seem to keep going and going like the energizer bunny!

 

For how much, estimate from the parents' weight and feed about 3% of that. For example, the average Cane Corso is about 100 pounds, so you would feed 3 pounds of food per day. Adjust more or less according to body condition, as necessary.



#3
naturalfeddogs

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Welcome! Do read the getting started guide, it has really good info. The goal of raw, is to feed as much variety as possible to meet all the needed nutrient requirements, with some organs thrown in there as well. Getting balanced nutrition comes over time, so don't expect to feed EVERYTHING needed in one meal. 

 

Chicken is the one usually started with, because it is the blandest easiest to digest protein. Then you move on to turkey, then pork, beef, deer, whatever red meats from there. The red meats are the richest, most nutrient rich (aside from organs). By feeding blandest to richest, you give the body time to adjust to each new protein. 

 

There are a lot of percentages and ratios and such, and they are fine, but keep in mind they are just guidelines only.It's easy to get confused and frustrated if you try to be exact about it. All dogs are different and some require more or less of something than another. I personally have never used any numbers at all feeding. I feed according to the dogs body condition and activity level. If using numbers helps you, then that's fine. Just remember they are guidelines only.



#4
NicoTheCaneCorso

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Thanks yall! Very helpful!! :)




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