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Colitis And Raw?

raw colitis

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8 replies to this topic

#1
Shalista

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Hi, so I'm very new to raw. I've done barely any research but I kind of got thrown into it. My dog Bax (2yr old rat terrier) has had some digestive issues. He always had very loose mucusy stool and occasionally spots of blood. Two Christmas' ago he just started streaming blood. It was everywhere. I rushed him to the vet and the vet said he had colitis and put him on Purina's DCO food, (which is basically nothing but corn and grain). Bax solided right up nicely and I thought everything was fine. 

 

It wasn't. He started getting very anxious and upset culminating about a month ago when he started making continuous noise. From dawn till dusk he would whine, growl, or bark and pace constantly. I tried everything. Vet visits, training, more exercise, more training, kongs, chews, massage. Then one of the people on another dog forum I'm on recommended trying raw. I switched Bax over completely and it's been a miracle. He went from 14 kongs a day to keep him quiet to just 4. He's relaxed, he's snoozing around the house, and he absolutely loves the chicken I've been feeding him. 

 

My problem, is the colitis. His stool is getting loose and runny again. He's only been on the raw diet for a few days but I don't want him to start pooping blood again. Should I try to wait it out? Is there something I can add? I don't want to go to my vet because he thinks raw feeding is ridiculous. 

 

(also I've poked around the forum a bit and I was wondering if there was just a general info thread somewhere? Like I said I'm very, very new to raw and any advice would be awesome.)


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#2
TRDmom

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Welcome! What exactly are you feeding him? I know you said chicken, but more information would be helpful. Some dogs do experience some GI upset when transitioning diets. Since you're only a few days in, I would keep an eye on him, but things sound OK.

 

Whole pieces of meat with bone-in is what we feed. For your dog, I would try chicken quarters (leg and thigh attached), necks, and wings. I would also begin slowly introducing organs, like chicken liver, gizzard, and heart. Offer small pieces of organ each day or every other day and gradually increase the amount (to no more than 10% of his meals). After a week or two of chicken, try another meat (like turkey).

 

Here is some general advice I recommend:

 

At least three meats in the rotation--but more is better. Red meats are also supposed to be more nutritious, but honestly I'm not sure how much more that is.

 

Make sure to give liver at around 5% of diet (either feed weekly or daily). This can be from any species.

 

Chicken feet (and duck, if you can find them) are a good source of glucosamine and chondroitin (for joint health).

 

For conventionally raised meat (like you get at the grocery store), offer some salmon oil or oily fish (e.g. mackerel) to the diet for omega-3 fatty acid to help balance the omega-6. Too much omega-6 in the diet can cause inflammation, hence the need to balance it. Grass-fed meat animals have a better omega-3/omega-6 ratio which shouldn't require supplementation.

 

There is a "getting started" page here: http://preymodelraw....el-raw-diet-r19 . Its a bit of a read (with small print!), but you may find it helpful.



#3
Shalista

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Thank you, that is exactly the thread I was looking for!

 

Like I said I kind of jumped into this feet first. He was driving me insane and I was willing to try anything. As such he's eating what we had in the freezer for people consumption, namely, boneless chicken breasts. I haven't broken out the scale yet so he's just been getting 1 half, boneless chicken breast twice daily. (he's 13lbs)

 

Good to know that I shouldn't be panicking yet. I'll check out that thread and report back!

 

Thanks for the help!



#4
Spy Car

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Thank you, that is exactly the thread I was looking for!

 

Like I said I kind of jumped into this feet first. He was driving me insane and I was willing to try anything. As such he's eating what we had in the freezer for people consumption, namely, boneless chicken breasts. I haven't broken out the scale yet so he's just been getting 1 half, boneless chicken breast twice daily. (he's 13lbs)

 

Good to know that I shouldn't be panicking yet. I'll check out that thread and report back!

 

Thanks for the help!

 

I'd caution that the getting started guide could lead to to feed much greater proportions of bone that the PMR guidelines (which are 10% bone) call for. I would be extremely cautious about feeding bone-heavy meals to a dog with colitis. The last thing you'd want to do is irate the colon with an overload of bone.

 

I would seriously consider ordering a supply of raw green tripe (not canned). Depending on where you live you might need to do this as a mail order item. A common holistic way to support dogs with colitis is to provide probiotics and enzymes as supplements. Green tripe is a way to naturally load a dog's system with beneficial bacteria through food. Another good thing about green tripe is that the calcium phosphorus ratios at 1:1 are nearly in balance with the suggested 1.2:1 ratio.

 

This means if you fed green tripe you could basically remove the tripe portion from equation when balancing the meal for bone.

 

You will need to slowly start introducing organs. Not too much too quickly, as that can cause diarrhea, but liver, kidney and other organs provide important nutrients that are extra critical when dogs have blood loss.

 

It would be great for others if you document your experiences. I'd keep a diary to help you see what seems to work, and what causes problems.

 

All the best,

 

Bill



#5
naturalfeddogs

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I can say from personal experience with colitis that raw can be the answer. Years ago I had a doberman with it, and no proscription food or med worked. Once he started on raw, it cleared up and we never had another issue with it. Our vet couldn't explain it, so he also couldn't argue the fact. In my opinion, raw is the way to go with colitis. Try it, and watch and see what happens with it. My bet is you will see a difference. Its certainly one of the key reasons I went to raw full time.



#6
Shalista

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I didn't want to necro a thread but I felt I should do one last update on this. Switching to raw didn't really help Bax's behavior in a meaningful way. (we've since started talking to a behaviorist)  

 

That being said, since starting raw I've noticed his coat has shined up very nicely. It used to be very dull and greasy and I had to give him a bath every few weeks. Now it's very soft and glossy and he hasn't been bathed since we started this. He also is super excited for his meals now and devours everything instantly instead of picking at it all day like he did with his kibble. He's stopped guzzling water and then vomiting it all back out again (he just drinks less in general). I've been scoping out sales for meat and so far it's been cheaper to feed him raw. Most importantly the colitis never raised its head. His feces aren't perfect (I'm still working on that meat/bone balance) but nothing is super runny and there hasn't been a drop of blood.  

 

I gave my last half a bag of dog kibble back to the vet. Consider me a convert to raw!


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#7
TRDmom

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I didn't want to necro a thread but I felt I should do one last update on this. Switching to raw didn't really help Bax's behavior in a meaningful way. (we've since started talking to a behaviorist)  

 

That being said, since starting raw I've noticed his coat has shined up very nicely. It used to be very dull and greasy and I had to give him a bath every few weeks. Now it's very soft and glossy and he hasn't been bathed since we started this. He also is super excited for his meals now and devours everything instantly instead of picking at it all day like he did with his kibble. He's stopped guzzling water and then vomiting it all back out again (he just drinks less in general). I've been scoping out sales for meat and so far it's been cheaper to feed him raw. Most importantly the colitis never raised its head. His feces aren't perfect (I'm still working on that meat/bone balance) but nothing is super runny and there hasn't been a drop of blood.  

 

I gave my last half a bag of dog kibble back to the vet. Consider me a convert to raw!

 

Good news! Thanks for the update :)



#8
naturalfeddogs

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That's awesome news!



#9
jagger

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Do yourself a favor, next time you get a blood test done, get the T4 carrier to verify his thyroid levels. Hypothyroidism caused our pup some behaviour issues - and almost always creates gut issues - diarrhea galore.







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