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Hair Loss


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#41
Spy Car

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Pancreatitis is caused by a sick and inflamed pancreas spilling the wrong digestive enzymes in an ill-timed release that starts dissolving the dogs own digestive tract tissues.

 

After reading extensively in the veterinary literature, it seems to me that dogs fed unnatural amounts of carbohydrates (as in commercial kibble diets) have to produce too much insulin in an attempt to control blood sugar spikes, which is a stress on the pancreas, and also need to produce grossly unnatural amounts of the enzyme Amylase  (necessary to digest starches). Both the endocrine (blood sugar regulating) and exocrine (digestive enzymes) functions produce a stressed pancreas due to unnatural amounts of carbohydrates being consumed.

 

A carb-loaded diet (that is sub-standard in protein and fat) conditions a dog to release large amounts of Amylase in anticipation of meals, because that is what the dog is used to getting (heavy carbs). So when a very heavy fat meal (especially cooked grease) is fed to a dog conditioned to release Amylase, which is the wrong digestive enzymes to digest fat, the pancreatic system goes hay-wire. The fat meal may act as a trigger on a system that sickened, inflamed, and conditioned to a low-fat, low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet, but it isn't "the cause" of the problem. 

 

When dogs are fed a raw diet that is high in protein and fat, the pancreas produces Proteases (the digestive enzymes needed for protein) and Lipases (the digestive enzymes needed for fats) in natural amounts in response to a natural diet. The steady release of energy (blood glycogen) that comes with fat burning does not stress the blood sugar regulating side of the pancreas. And the digestive side is not burdened with producing unnatural amounts of the enzyme Amylase.

 

With raw fed dogs the diet helps keep the pancreas healthy. Fat is what dogs are supposed to use as their primary energy source. A fat-conditioned dog is very efficient at turning fat into sustained energy. It is healthful for them to get plentiful fats and proteins. It is not healthful to undermine canine health with unnatural amounts of carbohydrates. Dogs require zero carbohydrates according to the National Research Council, the world's leading authority on canine nutrition.

 

Bill


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#42
Iorveth

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Incredibly helpful, Spy Car. I remember a few years ago hearing it said that it may be more appropriate to say that fat triggers pancreatitis rather than causes it as well as raw fed dogs being less susceptible, but I couldn't remember if what I read was from a valid source or not since, as I said, it was a few years ago. I will admit that I don't research canine health as much as I used to, at least, not in the area of the digestive system. 


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#43
Spy Car

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Incredibly helpful, Spy Car. I remember a few years ago hearing it said that it may be more appropriate to say that fat triggers pancreatitis rather than causes it as well as raw fed dogs being less susceptible, but I couldn't remember if what I read was from a valid source or not since, as I said, it was a few years ago. I will admit that I don't research canine health as much as I used to, at least, not in the area of the digestive system. 

 

Mostly one will hear "we don't know what causes pancreatitis."

 

It takes a little connecting of the dots. In sport/sled/performance dog studies, all dogs fed a high-protein and high fat diet thrive. Their aerobic capacity (all things being equal) measured by VO2 Max is vastly higher than dog's fed high carbohydrates. They have lasting stamina.

 

Pancreatic problems are further evidence that feeding dogs a high-carb diet, which they were not shaped by nature to consume, leads to health problems.

 

Bill


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#44
zeusthedapple

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Thanks guys. I appreciate all the active discussion. I'm not sure if I'm being optimistic, but I'm leaning towards Zeus and lack of fats. I had a bit of trouble gathering all the right meats in the past few weeks, so I'm sure their diet was lacking. Hopefully, I can start pumping in some healthy amount of fats into the diet and get things where they should be. It may also be noted that Zeus was looking more "sunken in" on his sides so maybe that could be attributed to lack of fats, also.

 

I might just go to the farm and pick up a pound of lamb fat to pinch into the meals for added benefits.


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#45
Iorveth

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Really watch them closely when they play to see if you can determine where Zeus really grabs her. Iorveth likes to go after Buck'sbig ol' hound ears, floppy lips, and the loose skin on his sides behind his shoulders. My late Brittany, Hoss, used to go after the underside of Dude's neck so that Dude's beautiful white ruff was always this gross brown color from being chewed on. Even little nips with those little front teeth can take off hair. Poor Buck always has tiny little bald patches on his ears where Iorveth gets him.


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#46
zeusthedapple

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The only place Zeus really grooms her is the neck and so I let that patch go past my concern. But She has dark skin and I'm starting to see more patches on her outer back thighs and I know Zeus doesn't groom there and more hair loss on her thighs in general, her head, back of ears, chest, under arms, that neck. It's starting to stress me out.

 

Right now, I'm not sure what is the breed and what isn't. I'm trying to reassure myself. Maybe it's what I want to believe but the thinning fur almost baldness in her thighs looks similar to some of the basenji photos I'm perusing. Perhaps that's something. Sigh, I'm at a loss.



#47
Iorveth

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The only place Zeus really grooms her is the neck and so I let that patch go past my concern. But She has dark skin and I'm starting to see more patches on her outer back thighs and I know Zeus doesn't groom there and more hair loss on her thighs in general, her head, back of ears, chest, under arms, that neck. It's starting to stress me out.

 

Right now, I'm not sure what is the breed and what isn't. I'm trying to reassure myself. Maybe it's what I want to believe but the thinning fur almost baldness in her thighs looks similar to some of the basenji photos I'm perusing. Perhaps that's something. Sigh, I'm at a loss.

 

I know your pain. My Fjord has a thick coat no matter the time of year since Fjord hair is just longer than, say, Quarter Horse hair and he started rubbing himself. Now, I got him right as the weather was warming up and it's common for horses to get itchy during shedding season, but he was rubbing himself bald and even bloody in places, including destroying the top of his tail from rubbing. At first I'm thinking one thing is causing it and then I'm wondering if it's another. We had him checked for every kind of parasite imaginable and nothing he had could have been responsible for the itching (he has a low parasite load which is normal since horses pick them up from grazing). It went on all summer long and stopped as soon as the weather turned cold again. Now that it's warming up, he's started rubbing again, although not as bad this spring, but we'll see. We were at the barn multiple times a day all summer. Once in the morning to turn him out early since the fences here are hotwire, giving him nowhere to rub himself, again in the afternoon to bring him in and hose him off (removing the sweat and salt that would only make him itch more), and then back again after some grocery shopping (after he had time to dry) to put Desitin on the bald spots to help relieve the itching and coconut oil on the open wounds and in his tail as well as rubbed deep into his tail bone to help moisturize the skin in there. He loved the attention so it wasn't like spending so much time with him was awful, but it made for a tedious summer. I'm hoping he'll adjust a little more with each summer.

I know this doesn't help you figure out what's going on with your pup, but I thought it might ease the pain to know that someone else is dealing with a frustrating issue that makes me want to tear my own hair out!


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#48
zeusthedapple

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Thank you, Iorveth, I do appreciate the story you've shared. It definitely is frustrating. But aside from the "patches" where I can only deduce is from Zeus, the remaining "patches" are merely areas of thinning fur and it's because she has dark skin, that I can notice it more. I gave her some kefir with breakfast today and tonight, I will give some herring.



#49
Poodlebeguiled

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Pancreatitis is caused by a sick pancreas spilling the wrong digestive enzymes in an ill-timed release that starts dissolving the dogs own digestive tract tissues.

 

After reading extensively in the veterinary literature, it seems to me that dogs fed unnatural amounts of carbohydrates (as in commercial kibble diets) have to produce too much insulin in an attempt to control blood sugar spikes, which is a stress on the pancreas, and also need to produce grossly unnatural amounts of the enzyme Amylase  (necessary to digest starches). Both cause a stressed pancreas.

 

Then the carb-loaded, and sub-standard in protein and fat, diet sets the dog up to release Amylase in anticipation of meals. When a very heavy fat (cooked grease) meal is fed to a dog conditioned to release the wrong digestive enzymes, the pancreatic system goes hay-wire. The fat meal may act as a trigger on a system that sickened and conditioned to a low-fat, low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet, but it isn't "the cause" of the problem.

 

Raw fed dogs produce Proteases (the digestive enzymes needed for protein) and Lipases (the digestive enzymes needed for protein) in natural amounts in response to a natural diet. The steady release of energy (blood glycogen) does not stress the blood sugar regulating side of the pancreas. The digestive side is not burdened with producing unnatural amounts of the enzyme Amylase.

 

In a raw fed dog the diet helps keep the pancreas healthy. Fat is what dogs are supposed to use as their primary energy source. A fat-conditioned dog is very efficient at turning fat into sustained energy. It is healthful for them to get plentiful fats and proteins. It is not healthful to undermine canine health with unnatural amounts of carbohydrates. Dogs require zero carbohydrates according to the National Research Council, the world's leading authority on canine nutrition.

 

Bill

Thank you Spycar. Yesterday I was looking into this and came across something from Dr. Becker on Mercola that was talking about this very thing you posted. It makes sense. I will stop worrying about Pancreatitis. Now what can I worry about? lol. 
 

May I cross post your post? It's really very good and might help a lot of dogs and owners.

 

Zeusthedapple...I hope the added fat helps your pup. Another thing...fat makes it possible to metabolize vitamins so if there's too little, some vitamins may be missing. Just a thought. 


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#50
zeusthedapple

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Thanks again guys. I'm adding salmon oil to the meals daily. The hair loss on her neck, where Zeus groomed it off... That should all grow back on its own right, no assistance from me? Or should I rub coco oil daily on it. I'm just curious if it will grow back and how long that usually takes.



#51
Iorveth

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Thanks again guys. I'm adding salmon oil to the meals daily. The hair loss on her neck, where Zeus groomed it off... That should all grow back on its own right, no assistance from me? Or should I rub coco oil daily on it. I'm just curious if it will grow back and how long that usually takes.

 

Of course, I have no scientific proof to back it up, but last year when Harlock (the horse) rubbed bald spots on his face, I put coconut oil on some, but not on others as an experiment and the coconut oil spots grew back faster than the spots without. We use it for Harlock's tail because it makes the hair less brittle and less prone to breakage. I don't know if that would apply to the hair on the underside of a dog's neck, but it's a thought for dogs like Dude (Smooth Collie) with the thicker, longer hair in his ruff. 


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#52
TRDmom

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The hair should return on its own without assistance. As Iorveth said, coconut oil could be helpful. The one thing I urge you to remember is that hair loss happens and As long as there aren't accompanying symptoms, the dog shouldn't need any special treatment. I have heard from nervous TRD owners who used allergy, anti-fungal and antibiotic meds because they (and the veterinarian) didn't know what was going on when the dog was simply blowing coat. That makes me concerned-- what effect unnecessary meds has on the dogs overall health. BTW, when a TRD blows coat it can look bad; anything from total baldness to "flea bitten" spots to localized patches. Certainly not like any other breed I've seen. I'd rather have hair come back in slowly than overload the organs and immune system with meds.
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