Jump to content

Welcome to Prey Model Raw
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account
Photo

Financial Concerns, First Dog (Puppy Who Will Be Large Breed). Monthly Cost For 100Lb-120Lb Dog? A

cost puppy large breed monthly

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1
cdeanvt

cdeanvt

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

hey all! i am new to this page and am hoping for some advice. I have scanned the forums and found that various prices for various kinds of meats. Ill start by saying that this is my first dog (outside of family dogs throughout my life). I really want to give the best to this new guy but i am worried that the breed (greater swiss) may not do well on raw? I was told by the breeder to 'keep in simple" and avoid high end brands such as buffalo, orijen. She said TOTW was ok but also purina proplan. I am just not sure what to do. I worry about the transition for a puppy and also the cost monthly for feeding raw. He will eventually by 100-150 lbs max and I want to do the best i can, without creating a financial struggle for my family. 

Can anyone weigh in on high end kibble vs cost of feeding raw? I love all the positives that come from feeding raw but am nervous about cost. 

I also was taken back when i was told to avoid high end kibbles by my breeder. I really just want the best for this little guy.

He is 4 weeks till we take him home, so i am planning ahead. Any advice would be greatly appreciated, i am so thankful for this very informative page and for all the amazing expertise- and above all the love for our animals =)

thank you in advanced!


  • OctavioMype likes this

#2
A D

A D

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 34 posts
  • LocationWestern washington
I am only 3 weeks deep in prey model feeding but so far It is costing me more than feeding orijen. My guess is with more leg work and bulk purchasing I may be able to bring the cost down to that of high end kibble. On a different note our 4 year old dog's breath has improved dramatically.
  • cdeanvt likes this

#3
naturalfeddogs

naturalfeddogs

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,299 posts
  • LocationTalladega, Alabama

I don't know why a breeder would advise AGAINST quality foods? Raw is species appropriate and your dog will do fine. There are so many benefits to feeding them what they were designed to eat. Read the getting started guide at the top of the page. It will help you understand how to get started. Basically, you will go protein by protein beginning with the easiest to digest to the richest, being red meats and organs. 

 

Welcome! We are glad to answer any questions you have.


  • cdeanvt likes this

#4
TRDmom

TRDmom

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 470 posts

When properly fed, any breed of dog will do well on a raw diet. I know many breeders (of various breeds, including Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs) who feed raw diets to their dogs. For your dog, you're looking at around 2-3 pounds of food per day. Perhaps more if yours is a working dog, as their activities generally burn more calories than more sedentary pets. Cost can be more expensive or cheaper than kibble, depending on your sources.

 

You can post an ad on craigslist asking for meat from people who are wanting to clear out their freezers (meat that is "freezer burned" or has been kept frozen a long time may not be appealing to humans, but is fine for dogs).

 

You can ask hunters if they're willing to give you animals like deer and elk (depending on whats in your area). Some hunters just like the hunt and would love to give you the animal.

 

Look for a local raw co-op. They can order in large quantities and get better pricing. Some meats ordered may be "unfit" for human consumption due to the meat quality (3D) or because the manufacturing plant is not certified for humans. While some people only want to feed "human grade" meat (which is fine, that is their choice), it is worth considering that ALL pet foods sold in stores are "unfit" for human consumption.

 

I am able to keep the majority of my meat costs under $1/lb. Poultry: $0.50 - 1.00/lb. Deer: free. Beef: $1.50/lb or less (via co-op and farm owner). Goat: $2/live pound. Rabbit and duck: cost of raising them. Yes, I can and sometimes DO spend more, but those are my averages.


  • cdeanvt likes this

#5
Mrs.ajruss

Mrs.ajruss

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
I'm new to PMR too and I LOVE it! In a week and a half, I've noticed huge improvements in our Great Pyrenese's coat - and as soon as the sun started shunning, his huge poops started disintegrating! We have a small income and have to be wise with how we spend what money we do have. I will tell you it cost us around $100 a month (outside of deer season) to feed our pup and we feed him about 3lbs a day (he is only 5months old and I think he will eat less during the summer - so that's just so far).

Although $100 may seem like a lot of money, I'm learning to look at it as an investment: less Doctor trips and a longer life for our dog means ultimately less money spent (if that makes sense). Not sure if that helps you or not but just my perspective :) Best wishes making a decision!!!
  • cdeanvt likes this

#6
naturalfeddogs

naturalfeddogs

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,299 posts
  • LocationTalladega, Alabama

There is money saved in less doctor visits. Good for you for thinking that way.



#7
Spy Car

Spy Car

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 378 posts

The breeder is wrong.

 

Blue Buffalo is not a quality product, in any case, and is embroiled in lawsuits for making fraudulent claims about the ingredients they use.

 

Pro Plan (Purina/Nestle) packs very inexpensive (and incomplete) vegetable protein sources like corn gluten meal into their formulas to make their numbers "look good" on paper, when they are cereal-based food.

 

Swiss Mountain dogs come with a fair-share of health risks, including joint issues. Keeping one fit and lean on PMR might make a huge difference. As would reducing the bloat/torsion (GVD) risks.

 

The costs are highly variable depending on local conditions and how one sources ingredients. I'm not spending as much as I would on a "premium" kibble. 

 

Bill


  • cdeanvt likes this

#8
Joejr14

Joejr14

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts

I can buy chicken leg 1/4's in 40lb cases for between $11-$13, pork for <$2/lb, chicken breast for $1.19/lb, and beef heart for $2.29/lb.  That's all from one fairly convenient butcher/grocery store.  I stock up on turkey when it's on sale at the grocery store (clearance after Thanksgiving was $0.59/lb) and usually get livers/gizzards on markdown. 

 

I'm basically spending $100 every 2 months to feed a 92lb 9 month old 'puppy', and that cost decreases substantially during hunting season when deer parts/leftovers come into play.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: cost, puppy, large breed, monthly

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

We use this company for SEO