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Tripe

tripe stomach

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20 replies to this topic

#1
Amanda

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I have heard good things about feeding tripe, and that dogs love it. But I can't find much info on when to add it to their diet, how much to feed, and how often. Is it considered a protein or an organ? I feel like this could be a valuable variation to my dogs diet. Would like some advice and opinions.


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#2
taquitos

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Tripe is considered a protein I think.

 

Honestly I don't give that much tripe... I was talking to someone who was a microbiology major and he brought up how the good digestive enzymes break down when exposed to air and when the tripe is frozen. I also never understood how a cow's digestive enzymes would help a carnivore (wouldn't the hydrochloric acid just destroy it?).

 

When I do give it, I give it with a bony meal, though. I give it to them once in a while as a treat :)

 

Also, from what I know, wolves pull out the digestive tract of a large animal, but do not consume it.. so I don't know why they would be eating the stomach lining of an animal. But I could, of course, be wrong... so if someone knows better on this forum, please correct me!



#3
Amanda

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I've heard that some people feed it every day, but I don't know how widespread that is.



#4
Amanda

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When my dogs eat whole rabbit, the digestive tract is their favorite part. So that is another reason I'm wanting more info about tripe and feeding it.



#5
Prey Model Raw

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Some people have great success with feeding tripe on a regular basis and others don't.

We have never fed it because our dogs don't like it.

#6
Pixel

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My dogs love it. I on the other hand don't. It stinks. But I try to feed it when I think about it.

#7
OwnedBySilly

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Green tripe (unprocessed) is a wonderful source of nutritional, while white tripe usually sold for human consumption found at most markets has been bleached and no longer contains that great nutrition. :(

 

Green tripe:

whole-buffalo-green-tripe.jpg



#8
Amanda

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Tripe is considered a protein I think.

 

Honestly I don't give that much tripe... I was talking to someone who was a microbiology major and he brought up how the good digestive enzymes break down when exposed to air and when the tripe is frozen. I also never understood how a cow's digestive enzymes would help a carnivore (wouldn't the hydrochloric acid just destroy it?).

 

When I do give it, I give it with a bony meal, though. I give it to them once in a while as a treat :)

 

Also, from what I know, wolves pull out the digestive tract of a large animal, but do not consume it.. so I don't know why they would be eating the stomach lining of an animal. But I could, of course, be wrong... so if someone knows better on this forum, please correct me!

 

I was speaking to my microbiology instructor, and she told me that only certain microbes will be destroyed, but many microbes have a special pathway to bypass the stomach acid, or if there are alot only some will die and others make it through, because there are so many. This is how all animals get their natural flora.

 

Also I've found many studies that wolves eat all of the digestive tract and organs first, but shake out the stomach and intestine contents before eating. And when they eat small animals, they just eat everything.

 

Also air does definitely break down cow microbes quickly, so in the wild I can see the benefit to the wolves eating it. But with how long it takes before our pets would be consuming it, most microbes would be dead. But I think other things such as the vitamins, fatty acids and amino acids in tripe is worth feeding it to help round out their diet.

 

I found somewhere that is is actually gentle on the stomach, good for inflammation and great for cleaning teeth.



#9
StanleysMum

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I think green tripe is wonderful and feed it every day as part of his boneless meal at breakfast. Luckily I am able to access it easily as my local pet food supplier sells it in 5kg (10lb) bags, raw free flow frozen large chunks. Firstly my boy loves it and secondly he has to chew it a bit which is always a good thing. Also it is very cheap compared to other proteins I am able to source. I got used to the smell a long time ago and now don't even notice it as I just take out a couple of frozen pieces and put into an old ice-cream container with lid for thawing for the next day.

Health benefits are supposed to be good - however I can't honestly say how they have improved my dog's health - BUT my friend swears it keeps her cavoodle's coat shiny as when she didn't feed it his coat became dull?



#10
Amanda

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probably has to do with the fatty acids, the good fats in it....it's great for skin and coats



#11
GoingPostal

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I bought tripe from hare today once and the dogs ate it fine but haven't fed it since, don't have a source for it and don't feel it's needed really. 

 

Interesting on the stomach content thing, I had a chance today to check out the gut pile from the deer my brother shot a week ago, the intestines are all together in one pile and what looks to be the stomach contents (no lining though) about a foot away.  Nothing in the woods seems to want those but every other organ was gone. 



#12
taquitos

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I was speaking to my microbiology instructor, and she told me that only certain microbes will be destroyed, but many microbes have a special pathway to bypass the stomach acid, or if there are alot only some will die and others make it through, because there are so many. This is how all animals get their natural flora.

 

Also I've found many studies that wolves eat all of the digestive tract and organs first, but shake out the stomach and intestine contents before eating. And when they eat small animals, they just eat everything.

 

Also air does definitely break down cow microbes quickly, so in the wild I can see the benefit to the wolves eating it. But with how long it takes before our pets would be consuming it, most microbes would be dead. But I think other things such as the vitamins, fatty acids and amino acids in tripe is worth feeding it to help round out their diet.

 

I found somewhere that is is actually gentle on the stomach, good for inflammation and great for cleaning teeth.

Thanks for the info!

 

So they eat the stomach contents, but not the stomach or the lining in the wild? (Besides the small animals that they eat whole, of course).

 

What exactly is tripe rich in in terms of vitamins, fatty acids and amino acids?



#13
Amanda

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They don't eat the stomach contents from large prey, only the actual stomach organ. In small prey they eat stomach and contents.

 

(In an analysis of a sample of green tripe by a Woodson-Tenant Lab in Atlanta, Georgia, it was discovered that the calcium:phosphorous ratio is 1:1, the overall pH is on the acidic side which is better for digestion, protein is 15.1, fat 11.7 and it contained the essential fatty acids, Linoleic and Linolenic, in their recommended proportions. Also discovered, was the presence of Lactic Acid Bacteria. Lactic Acid Bacteria, also known as Lactobacillus Acidophilus, is the good intestinal bacteria. It is the main ingredient in probiotics.

Finally, because of it’s rubbery texture, serving it in large chunks also aids the canine in strengthening it’s jaw muscles and has an added benefit as a form of canine dental floss.)

 

 



#14
naturalfeddogs

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I know when our cats kill rabbits, squirrels etc... they always bring them onto the back deck to eat them. Every single time all that is left is the stomach and intestines. 



#15
Amanda

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Hmm, my barn cats love that part. When I butcher rabbits they munch it up. Although the cecum and stomach they don't like as much, but if I rinse it out they eat it. Same thing with my inside cats, they love that part.



#16
GoingPostal

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I know when our cats kill rabbits, squirrels etc... they always bring them onto the back deck to eat them. Every single time all that is left is the stomach and intestines. 

 

 My cat will eat mice whole, but if they are a larger adult she'll leave the guts.  My ferrets eat mice completely and usually quail but won't touch the guts on larger rats, rabbits, guinea pigs.  My dogs are split on whether they will eat rabbit guts.  I just usually toss them, not worth the mess. 


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#17
gilmacd

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If you're lucky and can find it locally that's great. If not, you can buy it online. These are the folks that I buy from. 

http://www.greentripe.com



#18
Amanda

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This was on that website

 

Green Tripe Analysis Protein 13.33%   Fat 12.75%   Crude Fiber 2.99%   Moisture 72.24%   Calcium 0.1%   Phosphorous 0.13%   Lactic Acid Bacteria 2,900,000 gm pH 6.84 Ash 1.25% Calories 424 cal / cup Iron 126.4 mg/kg   Potassium 0.14%   Managnese 25.7 mg/kg   Zinc 23.11 mg/kg   Selenium 0.31 mg/kg

#19
taquitos

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Thanks guys :)

 

Well it seems like there is a lot of conflicting info. on tripe lol.

 

I honestly don't feed it that often. Hard to find here, and only my dogs enjoy it. I don't bother hunting it down.



#20
lovemypits

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I just got 20 pounds of it, I have always bought it on and off, my dogs love it, I feed it as part of their meal every other day,  I don't give it to Macy to often, I am not sure but I think it makes her itch more from what ever the animal has eaten.   I have got sheep tripe from TQDF, still stinks.







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