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New To Raw Feeding


Best Answer Spy Car , 04 October 2016 - 08:47 PM

I'd follow the advice in Jenny's post #11 above, then probabally cut out the kefir as the next step. Some dogs are fine with dairy, others not so much.

Bill Go to the full post »


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12 replies to this topic

#1
max

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Hi everybody

I have started my dogs raw feeding a week ago.

I am feeding raw chicken backs.

My Border Collie(6 month old)is doing fine,but my AmStaff (14 month old)bitch keeps having diarrhoea, one bout of liquid a day.

For what i read,the diarrhoea should have stopped by now.

Need some advice,my bitch is loosing weight,and i am starting to be really  worried about her.

Can anybody give some help here?



#2
jagger

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One bout of liquid per day? Is she only defecating once a day?

 

Sometimes chicken has added salt to plump the bird, maybe too much sodium?

How were her bowel movements before switching to raw?



#3
naturalfeddogs

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Remove any skin/fat left on them for now. You want the fat, but it can be too much sometimes in the beginning. As things get better, slowly add it back.

 

Be sure the chicken isn't enhanced with sodium solution. Some have a lot, so look for no more than 75 mg listed on the package.

 

You could also be feeding too much. How many are you feeding at a time? You may even want to try a quarter at one feeding, a back at the next.

 

Are you feeding ONLY chicken? Anything else added?

 

In the beginning feeding raw, they lose a little weight until you get to the red meats. Remember, raw fed dogs also gain lean muscle weight, rather that fat as compared to kibble fed dogs.

 

If everything still continues on after all this, you can move on to turkey if you want. 



#4
Spy Car

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I would not feed chicken backs. They are very hard on a dog's digestive system. I realize it is recommended in this forum's Getting Started Guide, but it is a recommendation I wish would change (understatement). Feeding backs is asking f troubles IMO. I hate repeating this message. But....

 

As Jenny mentioned, I'd also make sure the chicken is not enhanced, and would (temporarily) reduce or eliminate the skin, working it back in as the dog is conditioned to fat burning/digestion.

 

I'm move to less bony chicken pieces. Save the backs for stock, or use in moderation with ample meat.

 

Bill



#5
sushiroll

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I would not feed chicken backs. They are very hard on a dog's digestive system. I realize it is recommended in this forum's Getting Started Guide, but it is a recommendation I wish would change (understatement). Feeding backs is asking f troubles IMO. I hate repeating this message. But....

 

As Jenny mentioned, I'd also make sure the chicken is not enhanced, and would (temporarily) reduce or eliminate the skin, working it back in as the dog is conditioned to fat burning/digestion.

 

I'm move to less bony chicken pieces. Save the backs for stock, or use in moderation with ample meat.

 

Bill

 

I intend to start my 12 week old Border Collie pup on a raw diet and I was wondering how I should feed him a whole chicken over the course of a few days. The ratios are just making me confused! I understand I'm supposed to feed 10% bone so does it mean that any chicken part (based on the bone percentage chart) I feed would far exceed this ratio?

 

Is it possible to cut the whole chicken up into quarters and feed the back with more breast meat to balance out the bone content (for one meal) or would it be better for me to purchase leg quarters instead of a whole chicken?



#6
naturalfeddogs

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I have always started my aussie pups at that age on drumsticks, and once they have the whole chewing thing down (just a matter of a couple or three days), I use quarters. You can feed backs, but if you do yes I would add some boneless breast with it, but you don't really need to feed backs. Quarters are a better balance of meat/bone. The only time we ever have fed whole chicken was when we raised our own meat birds, or when our laying hens are to old to lay anymore. (or the occasional unusually aggressive rooster)! But we haven't ever bought a whole chicken for the dogs, because you can buy large ten pound bags of quarters that's a much better value. $4.99 for ten pounds vs. $3-$4 for one bird. 

 

Just do keep in mind, the 10% bone is just a guide. Some dogs will need more bone, some less. I have a couple who could go almost a week without bone, and some who needs it every other day at least. It varies depending on the dog. 



#7
Spy Car

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I intend to start my 12 week old Border Collie pup on a raw diet and I was wondering how I should feed him a whole chicken over the course of a few days. The ratios are just making me confused! I understand I'm supposed to feed 10% bone so does it mean that any chicken part (based on the bone percentage chart) I feed would far exceed this ratio?

 

Is it possible to cut the whole chicken up into quarters and feed the back with more breast meat to balance out the bone content (for one meal) or would it be better for me to purchase leg quarters instead of a whole chicken?

 

Yes, every bone-in chicken piece exceeds the 10% bone ratios (even breasts with ribs). A whole chicken is 33% bone IMS. Backs and wings are especially boney. 

 

Drumsticks are good with pups this age because one can hold onto the end to makes sure they are good chewers in the beginning. But I'd supplement the bone-in pieces with boneless (and probably skinless at first) chicken to get you closer to 10% bone. Too much calcium (and out of balance with phosphorus) isn't a good idea with pups. Add back skin/fat to bowel tolerance (pups generally digest fat well, older dogs coming from carb diets generally need a transition).

 

I don't agree with the idea that the ratios of bone are "just a guide" or that the chief concern is the quality of poops, There are nutritional balances that should be met to avoid some serious problems. Over-feeding or under-feeding bone are both things to avoid. That means learning the bone percentages of frequently served items and endeavoring to balance meat and bone in the diet.

 

It gets pretty easy to eyeball percentages after a while. Not something to have anxiety about, but it is best to be mindful of meeting the ratios over a week of meals. 

 

Bill



#8
sushiroll

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How do I ensure that I'm feeding the right ratios?
Do I do it like according to this website:

You know those lamb ribs are 27% bone. So if you fed your dog a pound of boneless meat and organ meats for breakfast and a pound of lamb ribs for dinner, he would be eating 14% bone.

He’s eating two pounds of food, half of which is lamb ribs, which are 27% bone. Half of 27% is 13.5% … but we don’t need to get down to decimals, so round up and call it 14% bone in his diet for that day.
http://www.dogsnatur...w-feeding-dogs/

An example of my pup's daily menu:
1. Chicken leg quarter
2. Boneless meat
3. Boneless meat

Given that a leg quarter is 30% bone, does this mean that the daily bone percentage is 10%?

Also, is it necessary to feed supplements like omega 3, kefir, coconut oil etc?

#9
naturalfeddogs

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The only supplement you may need is fish oil. If you are feeding all grass o my fed ref meats, and several oily type wild caught fish per week, then you wouldn't need the oil. Most of us aren't able to feed those quality of meats, so fish oil a fee times a week is fine.

 

Don't stress yourself over all the percentages. Feeding the quarter and a boneless breast is fine. I don't now, and after almost ten years of raw feeding never have followed percentages to a tee. I do keep them in the back of my mind for "reference", but I keep an eye on my dogs and let them tell me. In a matter of time, you will know exactly what your dogs individual needs are, and it will all come second nature to you.



#10
sushiroll

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I have just started my 12 week old pup on a raw diet for 2 days with a chicken drumstick for each meal, 3x a day, with kefir before his first meal of the day. He's been having diarrhoea but is otherwise as lively as any other pup would be. How long would diarrhoea after a raw diet transition last? I'm a bit worried...



#11
naturalfeddogs

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Try removing any skin on the drumsticks for a couple of days and see if that helps. Skin is fat, and even though you need the fat in the diet, in the beginning it could be too much. Also, be sure the chicken isn't enhanced with any sodium solutions. It shouldn't be any more than 75 mg at the most.



#12
sushiroll

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I've started him on leg quarters with all skin and fats removed but he's still having soft stool and it has been 4 days. He gets 1 leg quarter a day, split into 3 meals. Should I be increasing the bone content or adding anything else to firm up his stools?



#13
Spy Car

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✓  Best Answer
I'd follow the advice in Jenny's post #11 above, then probabally cut out the kefir as the next step. Some dogs are fine with dairy, others not so much.

Bill




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