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College Research/persuasive Paper

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#1
Sunny

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Hello everyone, longtime lurker and first time poster here! So, to the meat of the issue: I'm writing a persuasive paper on how raw feeding is better than kibble, and am having a bit of difficulty finding sources. Are there any research articles, or a "frequently asked questions" that cites their sources you can share with me? Anything at all would be super helpful, Thank you!
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#2
TRDmom

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Are you allowed to use books? I know some teachers prefer peer-reviewed journal articles. If yes, look up Canine Nutrigenomics by Dr. Jean Dodds and Raw and Natural Nutrition for Dogs by Lew Olsen, PhD. Another vet to look into is Tom Lonsdale. His book "Raw Meaty Bones" summarizes his research on benefits of raw vs. Kibble. Each author should have a web site for you to peruse. Good luck!
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#3
Spy Car

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Also, look at the sled dog studies by Reynolds and others. These are not "raw" studies, although many mushers have traditionally fed raw meat and fish if only in part, but look at the superior performance of a high protein and high fat (low carbohydrate) diet. Because critical to the superiority of a PMR raw diet is the fact that dogs who metabolize fat as their primary energy source (with proteins secondary) have vastly more sustained energy and an aerobic capacity that greatly surpasses the like for dogs fed a high-carbohydrate diet.

 

Then there a study (that I'm pretty sure was sponsored by the Iams Pet food company) that took the areobic capacity scores (VO2 Max scores) of out-of-condition dogs. They tested very poorly. Then dogs were switched to a high-protein high-fat diet. Nothing else in their lifestyle changed. After a time the dogs were re-tested. Their VO2 Max scores leap up very near the levels would only expect of highly conditioned dogs. This was the result of diet alone.

 

The more one reads of performance dogs studies (also look for studies on greyhounds and hunting dog performance, there are good ones) the more it is clear that dog who eat high-protein high-fat have superior performance to dog's fed high-carbohydrates.

 

Beyond this, it is clear that carbohydrate are not essential for canines—as is established by the world's leading authority (no exaggeration here)—The National Research Council in 2006, The NRC sets the standards for pet nutrition upon which the AAFCO certifications on dog foods are based. NRC says that dogs have no essential need for carbohydrates.

 

Look at the dentition of dogs (not made to grind plants, but to tear meat and crack bone), look at the short digestive tract. The high carbohydrate diet is not natural for the species. It is not what they were shaped by evolution to consume. 

 

Not only do dogs have no need for carbohydrates, carbohydrates are bad for dogs. Look for the study that show that energy production in dogs conditioned to burn fat was enhanced by observable changes (increase) in mitochondrial activity on a cellular level.

 

Some of the key studies are not on raw so much as high-protein high-fat "dog food." The studies were paid for (as is almost alway the case) by pet food companies. For the reason that dog food nutrition studies are virtually always paid for by the pet food industry, studies on raw food specifically are scant to non-existent. But the companies' own studies point to lower carbohydrates being beneficial; they just didn't take the next step.

 

Bill


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#4
Poodlebeguiled

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Bill, do you by chance have handy the links to those studies. That is interesting. Now, I thought...have read that it should be a high protein, moderate fat diet...not high fat. What do you think about that? Thanks for sharing all that...it's very interesting and such a case against carbohydrates. Well, we all know...it's pretty obvious that they're not designed to grind grain or raw vegetable matter, but the demonstrations of energy levels changing and all that...interesting stuff. Thanks!



#5
naturalfeddogs

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I've seen all of that info on multiple sites in the past, its just a matter of finding the reputable ones that have it. Bill at have them offhand for you, but I know I did considerable Google searches when I finally found all that.


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#6
Sunny

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Poodlebeguiled,  I hope this is sort of what you're looking for?  http://jn.nutrition....8/12/2686S.full   In other news,  I found an awesome research journal article on feeding bones to clean teeth,  it has some great pictures!  http://www.rawmeatyb...ary_Journal.pdf


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#7
Spy Car

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Bill, do you by chance have handy the links to those studies. That is interesting. Now, I thought...have read that it should be a high protein, moderate fat diet...not high fat. What do you think about that? Thanks for sharing all that...it's very interesting and such a case against carbohydrates. Well, we all know...it's pretty obvious that they're not designed to grind grain or raw vegetable matter, but the demonstrations of energy levels changing and all that...interesting stuff. Thanks!

To my shame, I've done a poor job bookmarking studies. I read so many. I've been meaning to start a tread here as an archive. Unfortunately work is busy, and time is tight.

One can do well starting by looking at studies by Dr. Arleigh J. Reynolds, DVM on sled dogs. Studies tend to cite other studies. Also popular articles on Reynold's will lead to other studies. Sorry to put others through this. My bad.

The studies all show that canines do best burning fat, not carbs. Carbs seem to interfer with the fat metabolism. In the field carb eating/ burning results in a short-lived boost in blood glycogen ( the energy source needed for intense muscle activity) but the energy is quickly used and the stores are not quickly replaced. So dogs "hit the wall" when run on carbs. In contrast, dogs that are fat fueled start with lower levels of blood glycogen, but under exertion the body keeps replenishing the stores of fuel as energy is consumed. So fat burning dogs have tremendous stamina as a result of having a tank that keeps getting re-filled via metabolizing fats.

Because dogs fed a high carb diet (such as a kibble diet) experience energy fade, there are some in the performance dog/sled dog/hunting dog worlds who are giving the depleted dogs more carbs/sugars in the form of water baited with malto-dextrine and other sugars. I try to convince them that they are just compounding the problem with a short term "fix" rather than getting to the root of the problem. But I'm sometimes a lonely voice.

Bill
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#8
Poodlebeguiled

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Thank you Sunny. I'll read those when I get a chance, hopefully some time today. (Got so much to do today. Akkk) I love learning about this stuff.

 

Bill...another well done post there. Thank you.


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