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Weimaraner Splotchy Coat

- - - - - weimaraner coat spots shedding

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14 replies to this topic

#1
kwhiting

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My 1 year old Weimaraner has had a splotchy coat for the past month now, and I am really worried. It started with a few small patches of dark fur in the back, which made me think he was just losing his puppy coat, but now there are patches everywhere and I am worried the problem is deeper. I am starting him on Raw this week (today is his fasting day) and was wondering if this is an issue that could clear up by changing his diet.

 

Thank you!

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#2
naturalfeddogs

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First of all, welcome! My computer said I have "permission" to view your picture, so I can't see it. Is your dog itchy at all with these spots? If so, it could be anything from an allergy to a deeper skin issue. Hopefully once you start raw, you will begin to see a change for the better. If it's nutritional, you probably will.



#3
TRDmom

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Welcome! What food was your dog on prior to a raw diet? What is your approach to raw feeding now?

The picture doesn't appear too concerning. Have you spoken to a vet or breeder (if your dog came from one)? If you're concerned to the point of testing, look up the NutriScan test by Hemopet/DR Dodds. It is supposed to be very efficient and cheaper than traditional allergy tests.

#4
kwhiting

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I spoke with his breeder and she was very concerned with the patches and had never seen it before, which is what originally had me concerned. I took him to the vet at one point and they just told me to bathe him with medicated shampoo which I've been doing. It's been this way for so long that I can't even tell if it makes him more itchy than usual because I forgot what it was like before this haha. He rolls over and scratches his back on the floor a lot, but he did that before this a lot too. I will definitely try the NutriScan test! that's a great idea! Originally, he was o\n Victor's Dog Food in the purple bag. He's been on that his entire life, but I think the raw may be very helpful!! The approach I am using is just following exactly what the 'getting started' guide says. I will begin feeding him chicken backs to start with tomorrow. Thank you!

 

(Better picture shown)

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#5
naturalfeddogs

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I think raw is a great start, because you will be feeding one protein at a time, and eliminating all of the unnecessary ingredients in kibble. Those can make it so hard to pinpoint the exact problem. Start the raw, and keep us posted on how things go!



#6
TRDmom

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While a raw diet is NOT a cure-all for every ailment known to dog, I think its a good step for your dog's overall health. It is possible that the diet change will help. Time will tell.

 

One more thing, you'll notice is that not every one raw feeds the same, even within the prey model. Some shoot for "balance over time" (e.g. a week), whereas others want balanced meals. The getting started page isn't bad, but I see them as suggestions rather than a holy grail. I suggest looking around the forum, particularly threads where people have experienced issues, to get an idea of the road ahead. Of course, if you have any questions, feel free to ask (but you might get a few different answers!). Good luck!  :)

 

ETA:

If you're going to start with chicken backs, I recommend looking for some boneless meat to go with it. Backs are pretty boney and could cause constipation. With chicken, make sure it isn't "enhanced" with sodium (the package usually states if it does). Chicken can cause yellowish stool.


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#7
Spy Car

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Welcome to the forum. My last dog was a Weimaraner (and currently have a Vizsla). Never seen a condition like this. Hope the new diet helps.

 

I do need to argue against following the advise to feed chicken backs as stated in the Getting Started Guide. Feeding backs—without adding a substantial amount of boneless chicken to compensate—will result in your dog getting WAY TOO MUCH BONE!!!

 

I'm with TRDmom on this. You will likely get a dog that had GI upset, vomits, or has constipation if you feed backs alone. I'll be less diplomatic and say the Guide is not only not "the holy grail," but is very controversial and IMO offers very poor advice for getting started. I wish this Guide would be revised, as the bone is backs is more than 400% of PRM ratios (so if widely out of specs with the "model" this forum supports). There are downsides to feeding this mush bone, and it is unnecessary.

 

Chicken quarters (or drumsticks and thighs) have plenty of bone for starting bone-heavy. They are a far better choice than backs IMO.

 

TRDmom makes a good point about making sure the chicken is not "enhanced" (injected with more than 75mg of sodium).

 

Also I'd advise stripping the skin from the chickens initially (save it in the freezer) and then build up the amount of skin left on as stools prove firm. Dogs need to condition to fat burning (which is optimal for them) so too much fat right out of the box can cause loose stools (which is why some advise over-dosing the dogs on bone to compensate). Better to reduce the source of loose stools (too much initial fat) and feed bone closer to PRM percentages. You DO want to build up the fats. Fat is essential to good health and high energy. Dogs just need to adjust many bodily functions when converting from carb burning to fat burning.

 

Best wishes with your W.

 

Bill



#8
Iorveth

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I've always started my dogs with chicken quarters as well. They are so much easier to get a hold of than chicken backs for me so I never did go with backs. Stripping the skin and feeding quarters was always a good start for my dogs except for the one who had a chicken intolerance. That just required a simple skip to turkey for him.



#9
naturalfeddogs

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I sometimes keep backs around for "poop emergencies", to firm things up. I haven't ever used them as meals, I think quarters are much better for that. Good amount of bone and meat together. 



#10
Spy Car

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I sometimes keep backs around for "poop emergencies", to firm things up. I haven't ever used them as meals, I think quarters are much better for that. Good amount of bone and meat together. 

 

The Guide does suggest feeding backs. Any chance of doing a revision with input and discussion from forum members?

 

I don't enjoy counter-programming a Guide that seems so flawed, when so many people looking for PMR are likely to hit on it. 

 

Bill



#11
naturalfeddogs

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The Guide does suggest feeding backs. Any chance of doing a revision with input and discussion from forum members?

 

I don't enjoy counter-programming a Guide that seems so flawed, when so many people looking for PMR are likely to hit on it. 

 

Bill

I know the guide suggests it, but it is just a guide, and I don't see Natalie changing it. Other members, new and old can decide if they want to feed them or not. One thing about prey model, is there are different ways of going about feeding it. No one persons way is the ONLY way, over everyone else. You don't feed them at all, and I do on certain occasions. Nothing wrong with either way, it's just two different ways. We can all give our suggestions, and share our prefered ways of feeding but ultimatly, it's up to each individual to feed a way they see fit. No two will be exactly alike. 



#12
Spy Car

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I know the guide suggests it, but it is just a guide, and I don't see Natalie changing it. Other members, new and old can decide if they want to feed them or not. One thing about prey model, is there are different ways of going about feeding it. No one persons way is the ONLY way, over everyone else. You don't feed them at all, and I do on certain occasions. Nothing wrong with either way, it's just two different ways. We can all give our suggestions, and share our prefered ways of feeding but ultimatly, it's up to each individual to feed a way they see fit. No two will be exactly alike. 

 

Unfortunately the "just a guide" is the thing many (most) newbies are going to follow as a trusted recommendation. And IMO it is very deeply flawed.

 

PMR ratios exist for sound reasons. The Guide is way out of conformance with PMR standards, and is detrimental for being so in my estimation. Why get people off to a bad start with an initial transition that does not fit the model even slightly?

 

Bill



#13
naturalfeddogs

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Unfortunately the "just a guide" is the thing many (most) newbies are going to follow as a trusted recommendation. And IMO it is very deeply flawed.

 

PMR ratios exist for sound reasons. The Guide is way out of conformance with PMR standards, and is detrimental for being so in my estimation. Why get people off to a bad start with an initial transition that does not fit the model even slightly?

 

Bill

The guide here, as well as the whole ratio thing is considered a guide for all, new and experienced.No two feed exactly alike, just as no two dogs are exactly alike. Your way isn't the only way, as is anyone elses. That's just the facts. This isn't going to turn into an argument, or the thread will be closed. No one person is "right". I'm sorry if you don't like that, but it is what it is.



#14
Spy Car

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The guide here, as well as the whole ratio thing is considered a guide for all, new and experienced.No two feed exactly alike, just as no two dogs are exactly alike. Your way isn't the only way, as is anyone elses. That's just the facts. This isn't going to turn into an argument, or the thread will be closed. No one person is "right". I'm sorry if you don't like that, but it is what it is.

 

Not a matter of "my way or the highway" Jenny. I've acknowledged that there are multiple ways to feed, such as balance over time vs balancing individual meals, so long as they meet PMR ratios with-in a reasonable time frame.

 

But that is not the problem with the Guide. The recommendations call for grossly excessive amounts of bone that don't conform to PMR ratios, or get anywhere close. If this is a PRM website (as it clearly is) then I feel the Guide should reflect PRM ratios, not one person's opinion that deviates so far from the model. 

 

Bill



#15
naturalfeddogs

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Then you need to contact Natalie or Jon, and discuss it with them, and let this continue on with the op's original question about feeding raw. This is their site, and only they can change that, but I don't see them doing it to please one persons thoughts, when its only a guide to begin with and no one is going to feed the same. 






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