Jump to content

Welcome to Prey Model Raw
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account
Photo

So How Does One Raw Feed A Puppy...?


Best Answer Iorveth , 07 August 2016 - 06:16 AM

Neither of mine needed bones smashed either, but they are two of the most food obsessed dogs I have ever seen and there was no doubt in their minds that it was food! However, as NFD said, some just need help to get the idea. If we're debating whether size is a factor, I don't think so, as some of the pups I knew who needed bone smashing were a Malamute, a Great Pyrenees, and a Bullmastiff. It was the concept they needed help with, not that they physically couldn't do it. They would pick the meat off the bones rather than crunch through the whole thing. 

My guys were all started on chicken quarters and turkey carcasses and they understood right away despite being weaned onto kibble. From what I understand, though, in most cases, those who need smashing, don't need it for long. 

Go to the full post »


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1
jagger

jagger

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 370 posts

A friend is looking at getting a pup in next little while and is curious about raw feeding. He doesn't do much internet and I want to make sure i'm giving the correct info in case he does go the raw route.

 

I assume it's the same routine as normal - just run through the proteins and smash or grind up the bones so the dog can eat them?



#2
naturalfeddogs

naturalfeddogs

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,283 posts
  • LocationTalladega, Alabama

The same as an adult, only more. As in, at least three times a day. Puppies tend to adjust easier, so usually you can go through the proteins faster. 

 

I have usually started young ones with chicken necks or drumsticks, depending on the puppy size, and smash the bones if needed for the first few days or until the puppy gets the hang of chewing. Then slowly back of the smashing.



#3
jagger

jagger

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 370 posts

Excellent, thanks :)



#4
Spy Car

Spy Car

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 378 posts

I never smashed bones for my Vizsla (grown weight 57 lbs).

 

He ate necks, and drumsticks and feet without a problem.

 

Bill



#5
naturalfeddogs

naturalfeddogs

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,283 posts
  • LocationTalladega, Alabama

I never smashed bones for my Vizsla (grown weight 57 lbs).

 

He ate necks, and drumsticks and feet without a problem.

 

Bill

It helps for some who are on the smaller side as puppies, for them to learn how to chew bone, especially if they were weaned onto kibble rather than raw. We had a couple who got it right off the bat, no smashing needed. but we also have had ones who needed the extra help. Solely depends on the puppy.



#6
Spy Car

Spy Car

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 378 posts

It helps for some who are on the smaller side as puppies, for them to learn how to chew bone, especially if they were weaned onto kibble rather than raw. We had a couple who got it right off the bat, no smashing needed. but we also have had ones who needed the extra help. Solely depends on the puppy.

 

That's why I listed the grown weight of my Vizsla. I realize a breed that gets to 15 lbs or 25 lbs might have different needs. My pup was fine with unsmashed bones.

 

Bil



#7
naturalfeddogs

naturalfeddogs

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,283 posts
  • LocationTalladega, Alabama

It really doesn't matter the "size" of the dog as adult or puppy. If at 8 or even twelve weeks(or younger in some cases), just don't know what to do with it, and need some help learning that it's food, and that they are supposed to actually eat it. Not that they can or can't handle it. They all can once they get it, but some, (even the size of Dane puppies) need some help getting started on occasion. And there are others, like yours just take right to it. Raw fed from birth, and they probably get it much quicker in most cases which is probably the case with yours.

 

So I guess in short, is that it's not the size a dog will be when grown, it's about a puppy learning what to do with raw bones to begin with.



#8
Iorveth

Iorveth

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 455 posts
✓  Best Answer

Neither of mine needed bones smashed either, but they are two of the most food obsessed dogs I have ever seen and there was no doubt in their minds that it was food! However, as NFD said, some just need help to get the idea. If we're debating whether size is a factor, I don't think so, as some of the pups I knew who needed bone smashing were a Malamute, a Great Pyrenees, and a Bullmastiff. It was the concept they needed help with, not that they physically couldn't do it. They would pick the meat off the bones rather than crunch through the whole thing. 

My guys were all started on chicken quarters and turkey carcasses and they understood right away despite being weaned onto kibble. From what I understand, though, in most cases, those who need smashing, don't need it for long. 


  • naturalfeddogs likes this

#9
naturalfeddogs

naturalfeddogs

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,283 posts
  • LocationTalladega, Alabama

Well said Iorveth! The "concept" is what I was getting at, just couldn't think of the word!


  • Iorveth likes this

#10
Spy Car

Spy Car

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 378 posts

I also tended to hand-hold most of the bone-in pieces in the beginning both to help sell the "concept," make it a bit easier for the pup to adjust to chewing, and (most importantly to me) to reduce any choking risk.

 

Chester has always been an enthusiastic eater (to put it mildly) so no issues in needing to encourage him.

 

Bill



#11
Iorveth

Iorveth

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 455 posts

Come to think of it, Bill, I did that. I don't remember if I did that with Iorveth (I'm fairly certain I did not), but I know I did it with both Buck as an 8 week old puppy and with Dude who was 7 years old. They were my first experience with raw feeding as I switched the day we brought Buck home so I don't think I even knew about smashing bones at that point. Buck is what I call my "python". He would eat like a snake if he could and he has tried. He will gag and choke around anything small enough to force down his gullet so I held it partially to help him and partially to keep him from death by dinner. Iorveth is a pretty good chewer so I think maybe I skipped the hand feeding with him because I didn't worry about him killing himself.

Neither pup needed help with the concept, but I have never had two more food motivated dogs in my life. Xolos are known for getting bored with formal obedience training so drilling them on one thing repeatedly does not go over well, but Iorveth will do something over and over and over again as many times as you ask as long as the treats keep coming. I think I could teach him to stand on his head if I offered him a piece of cheese!

Dude needed help with the concept. Poor guy. He was pretty brainless for a Collie. For years, I watched all these Collies around me and admired how smart they were. Then I'd look back at my bricks-for-brains and think, "Well, at least he's a perfect gentleman". He never needed a leash and he never took off (once he matured) so he did have benefits. Had I known back then, he definitely would have benefitted from bone smashing even though he was a grown dog.

Every dog is different and I don't think there is anything wrong with a dog needing help in the beginning.


  • naturalfeddogs and Spy Car like this

#12
naturalfeddogs

naturalfeddogs

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,283 posts
  • LocationTalladega, Alabama

I've also held some for pups over the years as well, but Copper got to where even though she got to where she knew what to do, I think it spoiled her and for a while she got to where she wouldn't eat otherwise. I had to then wean her off the whole holding it for her thing. Smashing always seemed to work better for me.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

We use this company for SEO