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Feeding A Chihuaha Rmb


Best Answer Spy Car , 30 January 2017 - 08:11 AM

I'm also a believer in feeding by body condition and making adjustments by exercise level, as opposed to a pre-determine formula.

 

That said, I've never fed such a small dog. For me personally, I think a scale would be useful (especially in the beginning) to get a feel for portion sizes (and especially in figuring out how to portion out 10% organ pieces).

 

People have different styles for meeting PMR ratios on organs. I like feeding 10% organs daily (one day liver/next day other) as I think it is easiest on the dog's GI system. So a scale would help me pre-prepackage the approx 0.2 oz organ pieces (at least until I got very used to eyeballing.

 

With a dog that small I might look at feeder animals generally fed to snakes (like feeder mice, rats, and baby chicks) as whole prey items.

 

Bill 

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#1
gilmacd

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I need some help folks. I'm looking at adopting a Chihuaha, which will be the smallest dog in my home. She weighs 6 lbs and her daily food amount would be .12 and her total for the week is less than a pound at .84. My other dogs are easy because they are...big. Has anyone fed a small dog a diet of RMB before? I found a few sites for cats that sell day old, and three day old quail, duck, etc. Or should I just get chicken and use a scale to calculate .12 daily? It seems like such a small amount compared to my other dogs so I want to get this one right. All the Chihuahas I see that are over ten years old are fat and out of shape. I don't want this to happen to any of my dogs. Your thoughts? Any help you could give would be greatly appreciated. 



#2
naturalfeddogs

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I feed according to body condition and activity level, not numbers. The numbers are guides, the body condition is always correct. It has never let me down.

 

as far as bone meals for such small dogs go, quail is fine, Cornish hens, chicken feet, chicken necks, and yes, hatchling ducklings would be fine. I have also fed frog legs to puppies as treats, or together with another protein. 


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#3
gilmacd

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Thanks Jenny. From what I saw, she's lean but well fed and in shape. And since sh'e only about 2 to 2 1/2 years then she's very young for a Chihuahua. So I can probably start out slow and work her up to 3%. If this is too much, or she gains weight, I can back off. Your response does help alot though because you gave me a few ideas I had not considered. :)



#4
Spy Car

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✓  Best Answer

I'm also a believer in feeding by body condition and making adjustments by exercise level, as opposed to a pre-determine formula.

 

That said, I've never fed such a small dog. For me personally, I think a scale would be useful (especially in the beginning) to get a feel for portion sizes (and especially in figuring out how to portion out 10% organ pieces).

 

People have different styles for meeting PMR ratios on organs. I like feeding 10% organs daily (one day liver/next day other) as I think it is easiest on the dog's GI system. So a scale would help me pre-prepackage the approx 0.2 oz organ pieces (at least until I got very used to eyeballing.

 

With a dog that small I might look at feeder animals generally fed to snakes (like feeder mice, rats, and baby chicks) as whole prey items.

 

Bill 


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#5
gilmacd

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Bill, you and I are on the same page. I've already been to websites that sell feeder animals for snakes, cats, etc. as well as a few websites that have various products for dogs. That's where I came up with quail and other small birds that might work. On hare today that have chickens, rabbits, guinea pigs, quail, and mice/rats in various sizes. I would probably steer clear from the mice for dogs as they are better suited for cats but the small chickens, rabbits, and quail are a good option.



#6
Spy Car

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Bill, you and I are on the same page. I've already been to websites that sell feeder animals for snakes, cats, etc. as well as a few websites that have various products for dogs. That's where I came up with quail and other small birds that might work. On hare today that have chickens, rabbits, guinea pigs, quail, and mice/rats in various sizes. I would probably steer clear from the mice for dogs as they are better suited for cats but the small chickens, rabbits, and quail are a good option.

 

The nice thing about feeder animals is that they would allow you to turn the Chihuahua's "downside" (the trickiness of hitting PMR ratios and getting suitable edible bone) into a positive of being able to feed "whole prey" (which isn't a realistic option for most of us).
 
What is the rationale behind thinking mice are less well suited for dogs?
 
I certainly have no expertise with this sort of feeding, but would love to hear more about your experiences as you move forward.

 

We get a fair number of very small dog owners visiting this forum and it would be cool to have someone sharing the experience of feeding "whole prey" (at least as part of the total).

 

Bill






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