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Major Regurgitation


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#21
XenaXander

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Ah drat, I spoke too soon.  Came home to find out that Sable had puked up last night's dinner.  Lucky Brad discovered it and he kindly cleaned it up.  He said, "It looked like chicken."  So I doubt it was a hunger puke.  Could she be developing an allergy to chicken?  The meat is fine, Remy is eating from the same batch and he's acting normal.  

I'll remove the skin and fat (I'd stopped doing that when her stools solidified) again and see if she can keep the chicken down - maybe those are too rich, as some of you have said.



#22
henrymichael

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Sable is 10 years old? What did you feed her before venturing into raw? How old is Remy?



#23
XenaXander

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Hi HenryMichael,

 

Yes, Sable is 10 years old.  Remy is 9.  I still can't believe I've had them so long!  When I first got them I did a lot of research on different foods and settled on Kirkland brand (Costco, made by Diamond I believe) Lamb and Rice.  Back then I thought it was a premium food.  I was already getting guff from my Dad who said that our dogs lived to be in their late teens just fine on Purina Dog Chow, so why was I spending so much money on foo foo stuff? And honestly our dogs did live to be at the top end of their age brackets, and they rarely went to the vet and really didn't have any health issues at all.  But I believe food was a whole different ball game back then.  

Anyway, after my cat was diagnosed with renal disease and my research pointed to the food I'd been giving him, I started taking a hard look at what went into their bodies.  It finally dawned on me that I don't trust processed foods for myself, why would I trust it for them?  I started out by making them crockpot meals - organic veggies and meats.  I mixed this with their kibble until the kibble was gone, then right when I was going to go all crockpot the vet told me Sable's teeth needed cleaning.  So I researched natural ways to clean dog's teeth and prey model raw came up time and time again.  So I switched!  Her teeth are beautiful, but her tummy... not so much.  :(

Last night I gave her about 8 ounces of boneless skinless chicken thighs (I can't find skinless bone-in thighs and I suck at removing all the skin - plus I was under a time crunch) and she did keep it down all night.  The gas issue was a bit better (Brad didn't leave the room like the night before) but it's still pretty potent.  She still takes treats, still greets me when I come home, but she does tend to spend quite a bit of time by herself.  This used to be normal but once we started raw she started hanging out a lot more.  And I have to call her to come eat.



#24
henrymichael

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Hello XenaXander,

 

13 years ago I made friends with the most mischievous, hard-headed, but adorable Redbone Coonhound… I named him Geronimo. He was 10 weeks old when I brought him home. We did a spit-shake… lol. I spit in my hand, he spit in his paw and we shook on it. It was my promise to him that we would be together forever. Of course I’m joking… well, just a little bit. From that very first day we were velcro’d and being self-employed that meant 24-7.

 

Geronimo grew to become the most magnificent coonhound that I had ever seen. At the height of his prime he was 64 pounds of pure nitroglycerine… and the dog could hunt! It was like poetry the way he moved thru the woods, but from very early on in his puppyhood I knew something was terribly wrong.

 

Geronimo began to have “hunger-pukes”. He would graze grass to make himself vomit. Out would come a huge frothy pile of yellow-green bile and grass. This episode would then be followed by a bout of diarrhea. So, off to vet we would go and they would do a fecal and blood exam (which always came out negative) and they would put him on metronidazole (Flagyl) suggest we change food brands (kibble) and send us on our way. Over the years these episodes became more frequent and more intense and it was always the same drill with the vet(s)… over time I fired three of them (quack-quack-quack). Along the way I spent literally thousands of dollars on tests to try to determine what plagued him… complete blood panel workup, tested for Addison’s Disease, Cushing’s Disease, Thyroid, x-rays… and on and on. Everything always came back negative. I always wanted to put Geronimo on a raw diet, but the vets told me not to. Obviously you’ve heard the same otherwise you wouldn’t be here. Anyway, about when Geronimo turned 8 years old, the episodes had become so frequent and intense he lost 12 pounds. He was suffering from malnutrition (mal-absorption). He had yeast infections in his ears, goopy eyes. Everything going in was coming out in the same form. The vets had long before wanted to put him on Prednisone, but I had refused. Sadly, we reached the point where I had no choice… his entire digestive track was on fire. All during this time, I was doing a tremendous amount of research and came to the conclusion that Geronimo had food allergies. I suspect largely because he was fed kibble much of his entire life.

 

I discovered several herbal medications along the way, applied them and they helped tremendously. I changed him over to a raw diet pretty much cold turkey, but he struggled and struggled with the transition. I found a holistic vet who assisted me, who understood exactly what Geronimo was going thru. After being weaned off the Prednisone he gained back all the weight he had lost and even put on a few extra pounds. We managed to heal his “leaky-gut” and continued to work thru an exclusionary diet, so I could find novel proteins that wouldn’t trigger an allergic reaction, but we continued to have dietary obstacles. The raw food was proving to be just too much for him. He needed a limited diet (with a variety of proteins we could switch around) and it had to be bland. The conclusion: I could cook it, or I could buy it canned… venison, rabbit, wild boar, enu.

 

Here’s what I learned… You can influence the way a river runs, but you cannot change its course. I fed Geronimo cooked when I could and the best of the canned when I couldn’t. He lived happily without any further gastric incidents for the remainder of his life. I continued to give Geronimo meaty “recreational” bones and he had beautiful teeth, never needed to have the vet clean them.

 

I now have a new dog and her name is Millie, she’s a rescue. She’s young, healthy and strong. We’re in the process of transitioning over to raw and so far with the exception of a few missteps (entirely my fault) everything is going as it should… but Millie is about 22 months old.


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#25
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I would feed bone-in chicken, not boneless at this point. 

 

Once she's had normal stools and no vomiting for a week you can start adding in other proteins. Turkey or fish would be a good addition, then pork. 

 

I would also cut out all treats, as it may be too much for her all at once. 

 

Adding in a probiotic might help her digestion, but I would not add them in the form of yogurt- tablets are fine. 

 

Beef oxtails are something I would recommend staying away from because they're the perfect size to choke on or get blocked lower down the intestinal track. 

 

Another thing to keep in mind is that she may feel vulnerable eating where you want her to- dogs can be fairly particular where they're comfortable eating. Do you have a yard so that she could eat outside? 



#26
Rambo's Mum

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Hello XenaXander,

 

13 years ago I made friends with the most mischievous, hard-headed, but adorable Redbone Coonhound… I named him Geronimo. He was 10 weeks old when I brought him home. We did a spit-shake… lol. I spit in my hand, he spit in his paw and we shook on it. It was my promise to him that we would be together forever. Of course I’m joking… well, just a little bit. From that very first day we were velcro’d and being self-employed that meant 24-7.

 

Geronimo grew to become the most magnificent coonhound that I had ever seen. At the height of his prime he was 64 pounds of pure nitroglycerine… and the dog could hunt! It was like poetry the way he moved thru the woods, but from very early on in his puppyhood I knew something was terribly wrong.

 

Geronimo began to have “hunger-pukes”. He would graze grass to make himself vomit. Out would come a huge frothy pile of yellow-green bile and grass. This episode would then be followed by a bout of diarrhea. So, off to vet we would go and they would do a fecal and blood exam (which always came out negative) and they would put him on metronidazole (Flagyl) suggest we change food brands (kibble) and send us on our way. Over the years these episodes became more frequent and more intense and it was always the same drill with the vet(s)… over time I fired three of them (quack-quack-quack). Along the way I spent literally thousands of dollars on tests to try to determine what plagued him… complete blood panel workup, tested for Addison’s Disease, Cushing’s Disease, Thyroid, x-rays… and on and on. Everything always came back negative. I always wanted to put Geronimo on a raw diet, but the vets told me not to. Obviously you’ve heard the same otherwise you wouldn’t be here. Anyway, about when Geronimo turned 8 years old, the episodes had become so frequent and intense he lost 12 pounds. He was suffering from malnutrition (mal-absorption). He had yeast infections in his ears, goopy eyes. Everything going in was coming out in the same form. The vets had long before wanted to put him on Prednisone, but I had refused. Sadly, we reached the point where I had no choice… his entire digestive track was on fire. All during this time, I was doing a tremendous amount of research and came to the conclusion that Geronimo had food allergies. I suspect largely because he was fed kibble much of his entire life.

 

I discovered several herbal medications along the way, applied them and they helped tremendously. I changed him over to a raw diet pretty much cold turkey, but he struggled and struggled with the transition. I found a holistic vet who assisted me, who understood exactly what Geronimo was going thru. After being weaned off the Prednisone he gained back all the weight he had lost and even put on a few extra pounds. We managed to heal his “leaky-gut” and continued to work thru an exclusionary diet, so I could find novel proteins that wouldn’t trigger an allergic reaction, but we continued to have dietary obstacles. The raw food was proving to be just too much for him. He needed a limited diet (with a variety of proteins we could switch around) and it had to be bland. The conclusion: I could cook it, or I could buy it canned… venison, rabbit, wild boar, enu.

 

Here’s what I learned… You can influence the way a river runs, but you cannot change its course. I fed Geronimo cooked when I could and the best of the canned when I couldn’t. He lived happily without any further gastric incidents for the remainder of his life. I continued to give Geronimo meaty “recreational” bones and he had beautiful teeth, never needed to have the vet clean them.

 

I now have a new dog and her name is Millie, she’s a rescue. She’s young, healthy and strong. We’re in the process of transitioning over to raw and so far with the exception of a few missteps (entirely my fault) everything is going as it should… but Millie is about 22 months old.

Your life story with Geronimo brought tears to my eyes. I'm experiencing what you went through with Geronimo with my boy Rambo. Although he don't go into a 'fitting' puke (touch wood!) like your sweet boy nevertheless we both have to suffer through his skin problems. It can be so taxing and stressful for both the owner and the pet. Truth to be told I think my boy took it in stride, it's the mummy that is really stress out!

 

Thanks so much for sharing your experience with me. I'll try and get him some Chinese herbs which dogs could take. I get so paranoid nowadays when feeding him that I literally check every ingredients in a bottle before feeding it to him.

 

Some owners even chided me for being overly sensitive to my boy's situation that I'm actually stressing him out hence the skin problems. Yeah, right! :devil:



#27
XenaXander

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I would feed bone-in chicken, not boneless at this point. 

 

Once she's had normal stools and no vomiting for a week you can start adding in other proteins. Turkey or fish would be a good addition, then pork. 

 

I would also cut out all treats, as it may be too much for her all at once. 

 

Adding in a probiotic might help her digestion, but I would not add them in the form of yogurt- tablets are fine. 

 

Beef oxtails are something I would recommend staying away from because they're the perfect size to choke on or get blocked lower down the intestinal track. 

 

Another thing to keep in mind is that she may feel vulnerable eating where you want her to- dogs can be fairly particular where they're comfortable eating. Do you have a yard so that she could eat outside? 

I do have a yard, but her habit is to go walk around the yard (or house, if I let her) with her food in her mouth while Remy eats his dinner.  She is looking for a place to hide it.  As soon as Remy finishes his food, licks the bowl, then the floor, and then flops down all full and happy, Sable runs and gets her food and basically parades around with it in front of him, showing off that she still has something to eat while he doesn't.  Then, I am not kidding you, he gets upset and comes over to me or Brad and whines, like he's telling on her, or asking why SHE has food and he doesn't.  

Sometimes she'll just go hide her prize instead of eating it, and if Remy gets anywhere near where she hid it she gets all fighty with him.  So I do whatever I can to discourage that behavior.  

But unfortunately she has consistently thrown up her food (3 days in a row).  Nothing even looks digested, and she's throwing up dinner from the night before, hours after I she ate. I experimented, and cooked her chicken (the skinless/boneless thighs).  She's eaten it that way 4 days in a row and she's kept it down.  Plus her mood appears to be better.  I think she just can't stomach raw chicken.  :(

When Whole Foods gets some turkeys in I will try her on that.  Or maybe I'll go back to chicken again when it seems her tummy has settled.  She was just losing too much weight, and coming home to puked up raw chicken is not something we really relish...



#28
XenaXander

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Hello XenaXander,

 

13 years ago I made friends with the most mischievous, hard-headed, but adorable Redbone Coonhound… I named him Geronimo. He was 10 weeks old when I brought him home. We did a spit-shake… lol. I spit in my hand, he spit in his paw and we shook on it. It was my promise to him that we would be together forever. Of course I’m joking… well, just a little bit. From that very first day we were velcro’d and being self-employed that meant 24-7.

 

Geronimo grew to become the most magnificent coonhound that I had ever seen. At the height of his prime he was 64 pounds of pure nitroglycerine… and the dog could hunt! It was like poetry the way he moved thru the woods, but from very early on in his puppyhood I knew something was terribly wrong.

 

Geronimo began to have “hunger-pukes”. He would graze grass to make himself vomit. Out would come a huge frothy pile of yellow-green bile and grass. This episode would then be followed by a bout of diarrhea. So, off to vet we would go and they would do a fecal and blood exam (which always came out negative) and they would put him on metronidazole (Flagyl) suggest we change food brands (kibble) and send us on our way. Over the years these episodes became more frequent and more intense and it was always the same drill with the vet(s)… over time I fired three of them (quack-quack-quack). Along the way I spent literally thousands of dollars on tests to try to determine what plagued him… complete blood panel workup, tested for Addison’s Disease, Cushing’s Disease, Thyroid, x-rays… and on and on. Everything always came back negative. I always wanted to put Geronimo on a raw diet, but the vets told me not to. Obviously you’ve heard the same otherwise you wouldn’t be here. Anyway, about when Geronimo turned 8 years old, the episodes had become so frequent and intense he lost 12 pounds. He was suffering from malnutrition (mal-absorption). He had yeast infections in his ears, goopy eyes. Everything going in was coming out in the same form. The vets had long before wanted to put him on Prednisone, but I had refused. Sadly, we reached the point where I had no choice… his entire digestive track was on fire. All during this time, I was doing a tremendous amount of research and came to the conclusion that Geronimo had food allergies. I suspect largely because he was fed kibble much of his entire life.

 

I discovered several herbal medications along the way, applied them and they helped tremendously. I changed him over to a raw diet pretty much cold turkey, but he struggled and struggled with the transition. I found a holistic vet who assisted me, who understood exactly what Geronimo was going thru. After being weaned off the Prednisone he gained back all the weight he had lost and even put on a few extra pounds. We managed to heal his “leaky-gut” and continued to work thru an exclusionary diet, so I could find novel proteins that wouldn’t trigger an allergic reaction, but we continued to have dietary obstacles. The raw food was proving to be just too much for him. He needed a limited diet (with a variety of proteins we could switch around) and it had to be bland. The conclusion: I could cook it, or I could buy it canned… venison, rabbit, wild boar, enu.

 

Here’s what I learned… You can influence the way a river runs, but you cannot change its course. I fed Geronimo cooked when I could and the best of the canned when I couldn’t. He lived happily without any further gastric incidents for the remainder of his life. I continued to give Geronimo meaty “recreational” bones and he had beautiful teeth, never needed to have the vet clean them.

 

I now have a new dog and her name is Millie, she’s a rescue. She’s young, healthy and strong. We’re in the process of transitioning over to raw and so far with the exception of a few missteps (entirely my fault) everything is going as it should… but Millie is about 22 months old.

I loved your story, thank you so much for sharing it with me!  And thanks to all the troubles you went through for your boy because you just felt that raw was the only way to go, you helped me see that it's ok if Sable can't tolerate it.  We just have to pay attention to the dog and see what works and then go with it!  Sable seems to be telling me that raw chicken is not her friend, so I cooked it.  For the last 3 days she's eaten cooked chicken and so far she's kept it down (she'd thrown up her dinner three days in a row again with the raw).  I gave her cooked chicken again for the 4th time tonight - we'll see how she handles it.  She still doesn't have a huge appetite but she is hanging out with us again, where before she'd just go to her room to be by herself.  So I think this is a positive sign.  

Remy is still getting raw, and I will try Sable on raw turkey when Whole Foods gets it in for Thanksgiving.  If we have the same results, we'll move on the pork or fish.  She's always been a little more sensitive than Remy so I guess I'm not surprised.  Disappointed, but only because I thought raw would be so good for her.  And she was doing so well - we'd gone almost 6 weeks with no incidents!  And her teeth look amazing!  What kind of raw meaty bones did you give Geronimo to keep up his clean teeth?



#29
henrymichael

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Question: Do you know the definition of insanity? Answer: Doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. It sounds to me like Sable is telling you what works best for her… listen to her.

 

Prolonged or repeated diarrhea and vomiting typically indicate inflammation. I can't remember specifically, but one relates to the large intestine and the other to the small intestine. When a dog enters this cycle, the imperative is to quell the inflammation. Forcing the situation by trying a lot of different types of the same stuff generally only worsens the condition (vicious cycle).

If diarrhea, or vomiting continues I found a mixture of slippery elm, marshmallow root and licorice root (powder form) works incredibly well for easing inflammatory digestive distress. Two parts slippery elm and marshmallow root to one part licorice root. One tablespoon of this combination mixed in with food per meal. Geronimo didn’t mind the taste at all.

 

Regarding recreational bones… Geronimo loved to chew on beef (short rib) bones... the smaller part that gets trimmed from the rib-eye. I like them too. Not surprising at $5.19 per pound. I also gave him pork spare ribs; not baby-back and not what they call country-style. Meat was trimmed as these were strictly for chewing. I hunt, so he also had venison femur. I didn't give him these every day... maybe a couple times a week... strictly recreational.

 

We all want what’s best for our animals. The hardest decisions come when we are faced with having to determine if what we are doing is for more them or more for us.


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#30
henrymichael

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Hello again XenaXander,

 

Have you ever read Lew Olson's book: Raw & Natural Nutrition for Dogs? I found it to be extremely helpful in understanding each and every aspect of canine nutrition. In my opinion anyone attempting to feed raw, or home cooked meals to their dog should have this book in their library for reference.

 

http://www.barnesand...n=9781556439032

 

I hope things have calmed down some and all is well with Sable.

 

Best,

HM


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#31
Rambo's Mum

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Question: Do you know the definition of insanity? Answer: Doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. It sounds to me like Sable is telling you what works best for her… listen to her.

 

Prolonged or repeated diarrhea and vomiting typically indicate inflammation. I can't remember specifically, but one relates to the large intestine and the other to the small intestine. When a dog enters this cycle, the imperative is to quell the inflammation. Forcing the situation by trying a lot of different types of the same stuff generally only worsens the condition (vicious cycle).

If diarrhea, or vomiting continues I found a mixture of slippery elm, marshmallow root and licorice root (powder form) works incredibly well for easing inflammatory digestive distress. Two parts slippery elm and marshmallow root to one part licorice root. One tablespoon of this combination mixed in with food per meal. Geronimo didn’t mind the taste at all.

 

Regarding recreational bones… Geronimo loved to chew on beef (short rib) bones... the smaller part that gets trimmed from the rib-eye. I like them too. Not surprising at $5.19 per pound. I also gave him pork spare ribs; not baby-back and not what they call country-style. Meat was trimmed as these were strictly for chewing. I hunt, so he also had venison femur. I didn't give him these every day... maybe a couple times a week... strictly recreational.

 

We all want what’s best for our animals. The hardest decisions come when we are faced with having to determine if what we are doing is for more them or more for us.

You know, I always thought as long as the dog is on raw, it would not have any major health problem but I was so wrong. I did not take into the factor that when they were young and were fed on kibbles and when doing the switch it could trigger some reaction. Some pets would get minor reaction while some, major reaction. Some pets have to go through a 'healing crisis' before they are really considered heal. I suppose their young bodies were so wreck with chemicals that once they started on raw their gut does not recognize good food yet thus the string of health issue as the body is trying to adjust to the change?



#32
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Raw foods aren't the best thing for every dog out there. Sometimes dogs need their food differently. Raw is also not a fix all for every dog. 

 

Maybe home cooked with some different raw proteins would be best for Miss Sable! 



#33
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Hi XenaXander,

 

I'm new to this forum and already gotten a lot of good advice from 'forumners' here. One of them - pugsrule - suggested giving Colostrum to problem pets. I went to read up this colostrum and discover a wealth of goodness in this health food. Ok, it may not be a magic food but it received very good recognition and positive feedback from users. I myself just started this colostrum yesterday only and I'm waiting anxiously for it to work its 'magic' on my poor boy. Maybe you should give Sable a try?



#34
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Colostrum is said to be instrumental in "eliminating or improving the symptoms of allergies". Extremely helpful if one is in distress, but not magic. You still must identify the allergen and remove it!!! The ultimate danger lurking in food allergies for dogs is that they can transgress into autoimmune conditions. The only way to identify a food allergen is thru an exclusionary diet.



#35
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Hi everybody!!  Sorry for the absence - dang work!  

The good news is Sable is back to her usual, happy, playing, bright-eyed self!  We gave her cooked chicken thighs for about a week until she seemed to be back to happy, then I plunged into raw turkey.  I found a local source for raw turkey necks, although I won't be going back there.  They had no idea where the turkey necks came from or how the turkeys were raised, just "my supplier gets a bunch of turkey necks in bulk and then I buy them from him.  Whatever is available is what I get."  He also thought there wasn't a market for organic pasture-raised turkey necks.  When I pointed out that my boyfriend (and several of our friends) buys organic humanely-raised turkey breasts and thighs and then asked who was getting all of the necks  I was given a blank stare.  Then he said that the turkey farmers must grind up the turkey necks. Fair enough.

Anyway, I bought a few packages to see if Remy liked them and if Sable could handle them.  And boy did she handle them!  She tore at them like a maniac!  I could tell she really missed chowing down on raw, meaty bones!  That night we had a scare - she threw up a little bit.  Mostly foam, then a turkey bit.  Don't know what it was but that must have been what was bothering her because once it was up she went right back to bed.  Since then we had some pretty nasty gas episodes that peeled the paint off the walls, but no more throwing up. And no mood changes.  She got turkey necks for 3 days before I ran out.  

We've since gone back to Honest Kitchen Embark, which is the turkey flavor.  I found an online source for organic turkey necks but they are cost prohibitive to be fed as a daily meal. So I'll continue to give her the Honest Kitchen and supplement with the turkey necks.  

Remy is still doing great on the chicken, and he loved the turkey necks as well.  I just can't bring myself to give them something that the seller has no idea about its origin.  So I'll keep searching for sources but in the meantime, you guys, my pups are so happy!  Remy brings his sock over for us to play tug of war all the time now (he'd stopped doing it completely a couple of years ago) and he and Sable are chasing each other around the house all the time!  Their teeth are still gorgeous.  I'm still holding my breath on Remy's coat, though.  He has always been a huge shedder.  He's got a double (I swear, triple!) coat and he's always got little fluffs of white fur sticking out all over, plus just a halo of loose hairs surrounding him.  He's like a canine PigPen from Peanuts.  His coat has not changed one iota since being on raw.  *sigh*.  


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#36
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So glad to hear that they're doing great!

Thanks for the update. I totally understand not wanting to feed meat you don't know where it came from. That's one big reason why I learned to butcher and started doing things myself!

#37
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Yay, so happy for Sable! 

 

Speaking of upchuck, the little brat just regurgitated turkey neck all over the carpet, and then ate it up. I literally had nothing to clean up. He loves his turkey! He also farts like a bastard when eating them. He has gassed me out of bed some nights.

 

And I totally get you on wanting to make sure the meats are the best source. My poultry source has an excellent reputation in the city, I won't go anywhere else unless I know the chicken isn't loaded with crap, and the price is right. 

 

The only thing I've noticed about coat so far is that he's waaaaaaay shinier and softer, but he still sheds. I'm just glad they're little black coarse hairs, not fur.


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#38
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How is Sable?

#39
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Sable is still doing fantastic!  Although she's getting a bit pushier at dinner time.  Little Miss THANG doesn't like to wait for her food!  Which of course, means she has to wait even longer for it.  Got to remain the alpha dog around here at some things!  Both dogs sit and wait until I tell them to "Ok, get it!" and they dive in.  But I found that as I'm putting the bowl of food down somebody's tongue just so happens to be sticking out as it goes by and, oh gee, SLURP!  Such a little booger.  

She's still doing great on the Honest Kitchen Embark (which is turkey) and I broke down and bought a bunch more turkey necks because she really seems to miss chawing down on the bones.  I had found an online source for organic turkey necks but I'll be darned if I can find it now, that I'm ready to buy!  <grumble grumble>

 

Natalie, I look upon you with awe for being able to slaughter your own meat!  I'm such a bleeding heart - I would have tons of pet chickens, pigs, goats, turkeys, cows, deer, rabbits, iguanas, snakes, lizards, preying mantises, whatever - you name it, I'll want to save it and give it a loving home.  I even have a hard time smashing black widows.  The only reason I even do it is because they could seriously injure or even kill one of my 'kids', so if I find them, they're dead.  But I feel terrible.  

 

Deb, every time I read one of your posts you make me laugh out loud!  :)


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GimMom

GimMom

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Yeah, being able to slaughter your own animals is a luxury to me, financially and emotionally. I'd have a hard time slaughtering stuff like rabbits and pigs because I think they're so bloody cute. I was actually even thinking about getting a pet rat soon, I miss having the little buggers. They're awesome pets.

 

And when I try to be funny, it's total fail and there's lots of facepalming. :P






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