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Neutering...help!?

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8 replies to this topic

#1
lauren43

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I've decided to get Lincoln neutered. It's been 6+ months no change in his behavior and while I know chances are it won't help I have to try.


My questions are about the neuter itself. I'm doing it through friends of animals so there are things that are not included.

Here are things not included:
Pre anesthesia Blood work
Fluid therapy during surgery
Pain meds

Should or shouldn't I worry about the above and why??

I'll be def doing the pain meds.

Thinking about the blood work as he needs a full panel but I'm assuming that's not the same as the one they do before surgery...or is it?

And I know nothing about the fluids..

#2
Prey Model Raw

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Pre-anesthetic bloodwork is just basic chemistry panel with liver and kidney values. I personally would do full bloodwork, which is more expensive but I would want to know information about their CBC before they're under the knife!

Fluids during surgery are definitely helpful with the recovery period. It keeps them hydrated during that time because not only are they fasted over night- but there's a chance he won't want to eat when he gets home either. Which means ~24 hours without fluids.

Definitely do pain Meds! Even if he doesn't seem painful.

Keep us posted on how things go!
  • huntersbow2010 likes this

#3
huntersbow2010

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As a fellow Vet tech. I agree! ^^^

#4
blacksheep

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Generally, unless you go to a cheap vet, they are giving pain meds without you knowing.  Some last quite a while.  Go home pain meds, is that what you're asking?  If they don't give them to you, insist on knowing the dose for Rimadyl or another OTC pain med.

 

Fluids are a must and most places do them anyway.  For number one, IV antibiotics are generally easier to give in an IV line than in the vein directly lol.  Especially since hydro + Cefazolin = a mess on the floor if either is given too fast.  Fluids also come in handy if the patient starts to get too cold.  Fluid lines can be run through water (or a fancy machine) to heat them up.

 

And as stated before, full panel is better but most use a pre op panel.  



#5
lauren43

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I got a full blood panel, pain meds, nail trim, teeth clean, and neuter.

He's acting normal now. The insicion was bigger than I expected and he has quite a bit of scar tissue. I'm going to give it some time and then call and make sure it's ok.
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#6
Prey Model Raw

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As simple as canine neuters seem, they actually are fairly complex and can have a longer healing time than compared to spays. Glad that he's doing well! 



#7
blacksheep

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As simple as canine neuters seem, they actually are fairly complex and can have a longer healing time than compared to spays. Glad that he's doing well! 

What makes you say that?  I mean neuters just involve hooking the chord, pulling out the testes, clamping and snipping.  Spays involve searching in the abdomen for horns, clamping off large vessels, snipping, and hoping none of it falls in because it is slippery.



#8
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What makes you say that?  I mean neuters just involve hooking the chord, pulling out the testes, clamping and snipping.  Spays involve searching in the abdomen for horns, clamping off large vessels, snipping, and hoping none of it falls in because it is slippery.

 

I should have been more clear....POST surgically we tend to see more issues with neuters than we do with spays. 


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#9
Jordann

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Glad Lincoln is doing well!!




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