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Iorveth


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#1
Iorveth

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For those who know me from DFC I am DudeandBuck'sMomma. 

I started raw feeding a little over 2 years ago when we brought home our Bluetick pup on June 1st of 2011. Unlike many, I didn't have a reason to switch to raw. Dude had no allergies, no stomach issues, etc. He's always been a healthy dog even though I was feeding him crap (Pedigree). I had been interested in it for a long time but was living with my mom and stepdad and knew they would never go for raw feeding for Dude and our Brittany, Hoss (who has since passed on). When I got married nearly three years ago I started researching it more and more and, since I was out of the house where I had to abide by their rules I made the decision to switch Dude to raw. We were also bringing home a new pup and we made the switch the day we brought the baby into the family. 


I have three dogs:

Dude is my Smooth Collie boy who has been with me for nearly ten years now. He's not the brightest but he is one of the sweetest dogs I have ever met who adores children and really is just a gentle soul who just kind of goes with the flow of life.

 

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Buck is my Bluetick Coonhound. He is a pain in the rear and is stubborn, and obnoxious, but is intelligent and has surprised me in ways I never thought a hound could. I was not prepared for him to love agility or to be the dog who would show me what focus during training really meant but he is a brilliant dog who has shown both a soft side and a protective side and is an invaluable member of our family. He is around 2.5 years old.

 

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Iorveth has proven to be my heart dog. He is a 9 month old, black, hairless, Standard Xoloitzcuintli. I had wanted a hairless dog for a long time and had been especially interested in Xolos but didn't know there was another variety bigger then the Intermediate. The Intermediates are too small for my taste and discovering the Standard has been an amazing thing. He currently weighs at least 50 lbs and isn't done growing so he is definitely a large dog. I never knew what intelligence in a dog was until I got Iorveth. Everyone thinks their breed is special and that it is the smartest but this dog's intelligence is just too big for his britches. We have child locks on things and, while training will eventually eliminate the need for that, he is a teenage puppy who is into everything. It is more like having a child than a dog. His problem solving skills are phenomenal and, when he starts using his little Xolo hands, there is no telling what kind of trouble he will get into. He is, however, a very well behaved boy despite what I might say and he is a breeze to live with in comparison to other puppies his age. He is just a fascinating dog who knows too much for his tender age. I can't even begin to express how much I love this dog.

 

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#2
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I've always loved Dude and Buck and I can definitely say I'm intrigued by Iorveth! I don't know much about Xolos other than they are hairless! I look forward to getting to know him a little bit better here :)


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#3
Iorveth

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They're amazing. Definitely my favorite breed I've owned so far. He is currently poking the blinds with his nose trying to figure out how to see through them to look out the window and he's standing n the treadmill to do is because otherwise he's too short. The brains in these dogs incredible. He's just a funny, happy guy overflowing with personality.


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#4
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They're amazing. Definitely my favorite breed I've owned so far. He is currently poking the blinds with his nose trying to figure out how to see through them to look out the window and he's standing n the treadmill to do is because otherwise he's too short. The brains in these dogs incredible. He's just a funny, happy guy overflowing with personality.

You were actually my first introduction to the breed. How did you find out that they were one you wanted? 


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#5
Iorveth

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I had wanted a Xolo for years but I am just not a small dog person. There are small breeds I like but not small breeds I want to own. The Standards are the least common size variety in Xolos and, because they were removed from the AKC in 1959 due to such little interest in the breed as well as the thought that they may have gone extinct, there just wasn't much exposure for them. One of the most common things we hear from people is "Oh, I thought they were supposed to be smaller". People are just so much more familiar with the Miniatures and Intermediates. We also get "He looks NOTHING like those dogs in the ugliest dog competitions" because, contrary to popular belief, Xolos are not a breed that is ugly. People are kind of shocked when they find themselves attracted to him and truly do think is beautiful and not just an oddity. 

Of course, wanting a dog just because it is hairless wasn't enough reason for me to get one so I did the necessary research and the more I learned, the more I wanted one. They are one person dogs and bond strongly with that person. They love their whole family very much but they just have that one special person. They are crazy intelligent and are extremely athletic. You can be looking at Iorveth and, one second he's right in front of you and the next he is across the room. The biggest downside to owning one is that they aren't fond of strangers and can become fearful but with a good breeder behind them and when given the socialization they need they are charming dogs. Iorveth doesn't feel the need to be pet by strangers but won't cower from them and is always happy to be acknowledged by everyone we meet. He just doesn't want hands on him and, with him in particular, it is because he is too busy seeing everything else there is to see, not because he is shy. If invited, he'll crawl into a perfect stranger's arms. 

I love each breed I have had (Labrador, Doberman, Rottweiler, Dalmatian, Brittany, Smooth Collie, Bluetick Coonhound) but, so far, the Xolo is, far and away, my favorite. We are already thinking about dog #4 and, while I have always wanted a new breed each time, the thought of getting another Xolo crosses my mind again and again. If the next dog isn't another Xolo (from Mexico this time) the one after will be.


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#6
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I definitely want to see more pictures of him....I'm intrigued! 


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#7
Iorveth

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Natalie, I don't know how intrigued you are but I have plenty more pictures since the last time I was here.

This was this past summer. The picture posted before was from his first summer (last year-2013) we had the boat in the water and this one is from this past  summer. He loves the boat and, while he does hate wearing the lifejacket, he gets excited every time I get it out because he knows we're going to descend the devil's staircase to hop on the boat for a while. We'll just cruise out to the middle of the bay and cut the engine. I read a book, Nick fishes (and sometimes I do as well), and Iorveth jumps between a peanut butter filled Kong and staring out over the water to look for seals and sea gulls. When we DO need to travel, he hunkers down next to me with his nose straight up in the air until we stop again. He even gets to go out with us when we're just dropping or checking the crab pots since he's so easy to take and he loves it so much. 

 

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#8
TRDmom

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Welcome! Don't you love being married? hehe Don't get me wrong, my parents were great but I wasn't allowed a dog. My husband has accepted three dogs (two have passed away from age), including my pain in the rear (for him anyway) Thai Ridgeback Dog (which are pretty similar in nature to Xolos) and... knows when I'm loading the shopping cart with meat and animal parts that it's for the dog! LOL



#9
Iorveth

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I really do. I was really the only animal person in my family and I was the one who did the research and breeder picking when we got Dude when I was 13. All they did was buy him and drive me to go pick out the puppy. Everything else from deciding the breed to caring for him was left to me. My stepdad was mad because he wanted a Lab! He was also a little bitter about this dog being the "replacement" dog for his beloved Dalmatian that had passed 6 months earlier. We all know one dog cannot replace another but I think he felt like we were forgetting about her. He loves Dude now.

When I got married, Dude came with us. I would have taken our Brittany as well because my stepdad had given him to me after he saw how much Hoss and I had bonded after they had gotten married but I have two younger brothers and they would have been heartbroken. It was a common thing to wake up in the morning to find Hoss laying on the floor in front of the tv in the loft with my youngest brother using his belly as a pillow while he played video games. So Hoss stayed. Ultimately, he only made it 6 more months after I left before my family had him put down as he was closing in on 18 years and apparently went downhill fast in the last couple of months. He'd had a stroke before I moved out and we knew it was coming. I think moving 1400 miles away would have been too hard on him.

But anyways! After we'd been married for just a few months, we started talking about another dog. We brought home Buck, our Bluetick, about 6 months into our marriage. He was my best buddy for a long time but, when we brought Iorveth home nearly 2 years ago now, I could easily see that Iorveth was THE dog for me and Nick took over most of Buck's handling so I could focus on instilling manners in the new pup and he was ready to "graduate" from Dude, the gentleman. Those two are two peas in a pod and, while it might make me slightly jealous, Buck and my husband are absolutely perfect for each other.

 

I love it because, when we decide we are ready for another dog, it can be just about any breed we want. My family NEVER would have gone for a hairless dog. I went through breed after breed being poo-pooed by my family (without knowing anything about the breed they were poo-pooing) and the majority finally decided they found the Smooth Collie aesthetically pleasing. That was the extent of their involvement in helping choose the breed. It was still up to me to come up with the potential ideas. With just Nick and I, we have a whole list of dogs we'd be happy to own. My mom would have turned down a Dane simply because of the size, yet Nick and I already know we're going to own one (When? I don't know. Hopefully in the few years). We have refrained from my love of Dobermans and other restricted breeds because he's in the Navy and finding housing without breed prejudices is just one more difficulty we don't want to deal with but I grew up with Dobes and would be thrilled to have another once we settle down and buy property.



#10
TRDmom

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I also love Dobermans (I've trained and cared for god knows how many!), but due our homeowner's insurance won't be getting one anytime soon. We used to have a Boxer and a Japanese Chin that were rehomed to us after we bought our house. Unfortunately, we lost both of them last year due to age/infirmity. Having just one dog seems almost like we don't even have one! He's out of his puppy stage (he's also 2) and is pretty easy to live with; we know each other and what to expect from each other. My husband and I are talking about our next dog already... I've accidentally sold him on a Great Pyrenees! ;)



#11
Iorveth

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No Pyrenees for me! Too much hair! I have met a good number of them, though, and they have been incredibly sweet and pleasant to be around. Two were livestock guardian dogs and, provided you weren't a coyote or trying to take the sheep, they were just so dang sweet. I will gladly and happily play with someone else's Pyr but there's a reason I love my hairless dog so much! There are some longer haired breeds I would love to have but the short haired ones are all at the top of the list. I can't say I would be upset, though, if I ended up with a Pyr somehow. I can imagine their personalities might be enough to outweigh my dislike of the hair.

I know what you mean about the one dog household. Dude's so low maintenance that you could hardly tell he was there. He was 7 already when we got married so he was already very much a mature, adult dog. We both almost felt like he was just sleeping himself to death. When I say low maintenance, I MEAN low maintenance. That dog could never be walked again in his life and he would never build up excess energy. I've never even seen him run as fast as he can. I don't know that he ever HAS run as fast as he can. He will bounce along at a good pace but you can tell it's not even close to all he's capable of. He turned 11 this past November so he is getting up there and his joints are not what they used to be but he has always been the dog that, whether you take him around the block once or take him on a miles long hike and he's happy with either one. He's always been a gentleman. He's not the brightest star in the sky but he is just a very nice dog.

 

Because he is the way he is, we felt like we just needed more excitement in our lives for both us and him. So we brought home Buck... And then Iorveth. And if we weren't renting, we'd have another. And maybe another. Our landlords bought the house from our previous landlords (we were part of the deal or they didn't want the house!) so we are very lucky that we are in a place where our dogs are loved, not just by us, but by all of our neighbors. 

As far as Dobermans go, I've been hearing from some Dobe owners that they are slowly but surely becoming easier to get insurance with. I think their reputation is finally starting to pull itself over the edge of the pit it's been in for so many years. Our previous landlords didn't care what kind of dogs we had as long as they were not American Pit Bull Terriers and it wasn't because of their dislike of them. It was because of the liability that, as homeowners and landlords, they didn't want to deal with. Dobermans, Rotties, etc were all ok with them. We want to make sure we live in a place with no BSL before we get a Doberman. We want everything squared away so we can own the dog without worry. If that takes several more years then it takes several more years. 

You know, in one of the old Xolo rescues (it's no longer around but another that I am involved in has been created to fill the gap) there was a Thai Ridgeback bitch for a while. I can't remember how they got a hold of her but the people who contacted the rescue thought she was a Xolo. Turns out, she was a Thai Ridgeback but dang, she was a beautiful dog. She was one of the grey/blue ones. I don't know much about their colors. I've always found them to be fascinating and could see myself with one one day. Are they considered a primitive breed like Xolos are?



#12
TRDmom

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Trust me, the Pyr hair is a drawback for me too! Thais, while they are not hairless, hardly shed so I barely notice any dog hair (my boxer shed like crazy regardless of what I did!). We're also talking about having a small farm somewhere in the future, so the Pry would be used as a livestock guardian, but still very much a member of the family. I would like a Kangal (Turkish livestock guardian), but a pure, well-bred Kangal is so hard to come by in the US because its technically illegal to export them from Turkey so that's probably a 'no go.' 

 

Yes, Thais are a primitive breed. Just like Xolos, you're either going to love or hate them for it! ;) I had seen Xolos in dog books a looong time ago, but whenever I've looked for breeders not much has come up. Thais stole my heart and the rest is history! hehe I do know of a breeder in Europe that has both Xolos and Thais. The brreds do look similar and I can understand how people would be confused. Usually people confuse Pa Gaw for a Rhodesian Ridgeback since he's red or insist he's mixed... I also get tired of the confusion about primitive breeds (vs. more domestic dogs, e.g. labs or boxers). Wish I didn't have those questions all the time, but I guess that comes with the breed. Now I usually call him a 'Thailand Dog' and keep going. Bad, I know, but google should be able to help them out after that.

 

If you want a little more info about Thais, including pictures, you might want to check out the Thai Ridgeback Dogs USA site. http://www.trdusa.org/

 

Interesting news on dobes! One place we rented, the landlord said no puppies or pit bulls, but was open to anything else. 



#13
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Ivoreth is a striking and handsome dog......I would *love* to meet him!

#14
Iorveth

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We'll have to get on that, Natalie. We still have yet to go to Idaho. DH's grandmother lives there as well but life has just been so busy! We live 40 minutes from Seattle and have been there once in the last 1.5 years. Granted, we don't like Seattle and the bigger cities but there is still fun stuff to do there that we haven't gotten the chance to do. 

I've always been under the impression that Thais have a super short, sleek coat. That's how they look in the photos. I don't believe I have ever seen one in real like. A friend of mine has two Pyrs and an Akbash for her livestock. She was having an issue with mountain lions even with the Pyrs and the presence of the Akbash has put an end to that. You sound like me and horses. There are a number of horse breeds I'd like to have but some are just so rare (especially the certain draft breeds) that I might have to settle for a more common horse that I like. I'm not fussed, though. I really like Percherons so my rare breeds being nearly unobtainable outside of sporthorse crosses wouldn't be that upsetting.

If you are ever interested in Xolos, I can point you to a number of American breeders and one Mexican breeder (who my next Xolo will be coming from as Iorveth's breeder gets his breeding stock from THIS breeder). I've gotten to know a good amount of them and they're wonderful people. Of course, yo have bad eggs in any group but the folks I've gotten to know have been very nice people who love these dogs very much. I know what you mean about the confusion. because he's hairless, we can't make it 20 steps before someone else is stopping us to ask what kind of dog he is. Our favorite little coffee place has a drive through window on each side and you can see through the other side. When we have Iorveth with us, customers in the drive through on the opposite side will even ask the barista to ask us what kind of dog he is. Now, when you tell someone, "Oh, he's a Xoloitzcuintli" they almost ALWAYS say, "A what???" or "Ok, say that for me one more time". I have gotten to the point where, after I repeat it for them, I say, "They were formerly known as the Mexican Hairless in the AKC" since that's what the AKC used to call them before they were dropped by the kennel club. Then they say, "Ohhhhhh", they frown, and say, "I thought they were supposed to be smaller". Then I have to explain tot hem that, like Poodles, there are three different size groups.

Having a rare breed sure does mean lots of repetitive information! I would imagine that people like Natalie get stopped out and about too because Danes are so enormous. It doesn't have anything to do with the fact that they're huge but I sure can't help but stop and ask to meet someone Dane when I see one. I met a beautiful little mantle puppy a couple of weeks ago and was so ready to stuff him in my pocket and run! Seriously... I need a Dane. One day!

Edit: Just some really weird wording and spelling errors!


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#15
TRDmom

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I love mantle danes! There was one that I regularly cared for. She was super sweet! :) My husband and I are split on what we would like from a next dog. I was thinking of something smaller (20-40 pounds), he wants something over 100 pounds. I like independent thinkers, he prefers a more submissive type of dog. I thought he would like danes, but he says he likes Pyrs better. Well... ultimately it'll be me picking out the dog since I'm the one who gives the majority of the care. ;) I'm leaning toward a tyrant Basenji, but would love another Thai! Right now we're getting ready for the second baby, so a getting a dog will wait. I can still plan and dream! hehe



#16
TRDmom

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I've always been under the impression that Thais have a super short, sleek coat. That's how they look in the photos. I don't believe I have ever seen one in real like. 

 

You're right, they do have short coats. The really short coats are referred to as 'velvet' since that is what they resemble. My TRD has a 'regular' short coat, but even with it grown out for winter, its about the length and density of a lab (and thins out again in the warmer months). While Thais have short coats, they should never be sparse. 



#17
Iorveth

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I like independent thinkers, he prefers a more submissive type of dog.

 

 

I have two independent thinkers... Dude is your typical Collie (although he doesn't have the typical Collie intelligence) and will do whatever you tell him to do just to make you happy but the other two... Boy, do they have minds of their own! Buck, being a hound, is the definition of independent. He is VERY smart but man, he has to think it's worth his time and effort. Iorveth, even though he's an independent little $**t... I have never had a better dog. I wish I could even describe how much I love that dog. He very much loves being around his people (my husband and I) and hates being left out, even if I close him out of the room I am in (he glues himself to the door and waits quietly until I come out) but he is also very independent. Well, the you know the primitive breed independence, I'm sure. It's nice to talk to someone with a primitive dog who can understand what it's like to live with one. Although, what I can't stand is when other Xolo owners make excuses for their dogs' bad behavior. I don't know if it's like that with Thais but you hear a lot of "My Xolo did this (behavior that I would NEVER tolerate from Iorveth) but, what are you gonna do? He's a Xolo. It's just how they are." I sit there with my mouth hanging open because 
that behavior would never fly in my house, primitive or not. 

All that said, I'm actually looking forward to the day we bring home a Chesapeake Bay Retriever. I'm NOT a retriever person but I have a very soft spot for Chessies. Our family's best friends had one who has since passed and the neighbors down the road liked her so much that they got one too. Both dogs were just so awesome. They're gorgeous dogs and every Chessie I have ever met has been a pleasure to be around. I am ready for a dog that has the retriever mindset (not counting the BYB crazies that are so common). I am absolutely going to have another Xolo but the retriever mindset sounds very nice. It would be a hunting dog so it will be a few years when we are actually hunting on a regular basis.
 



#18
TRDmom

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Its almost scary reading your post, I could have written that myself (just replace "Xolo" with "TRD")! Last night I had to tell Pa Gaw to leave the bedroom since my husband doesn't like him in the room at night (he fears accidentally stepping on the dog and getting bit); he knew what I was saying, but instead tried to 'sweet talk' me into letting him stay. He'll totally play it up... thumping his tail on the floor, turning on his side and pulling his paws up, etc. He definitely loves being with us, but has his own ideas about what he wants to do. Not that he's downright disobedient, but you can totally tell when he's trying to bargain his way out of doing something... and then the look of 'fine, you win' when he concedes.

 

Our Boxer and Japanese Chin were smart too, but there is a difference between them. Not necessarily better or worse, just different. Its kind of funny (more like strange) when other people bring up primitive breeds, what that means, and what breeds fall in that category. The poor things get all confused and/or upset that their breed isn't primitive. Like you said, it's nice talking with another primitive breed owner. :)

 

As for Chessies... I feel the same way. I remember seeing them in a dog book when I was a small child; later on I volunteered at an animal shelter where a few different breed rescues housed dogs they didn't have foster homes for and--you guessed it--Chesapeake Bay Retrievers were there! ;) I prefer that they are 'harder' than Goldens and Labs, which is a better fit for me. I'm thinking my husband would like having a water dog since he LOVES fishing/being at the river in summer (actually anytime!). Also, Chessies are a lot more obedient and people friendly than TRDs, which is what my husband likes. They might just be our "compromise dog!" hehe



#19
Iorveth

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Oh, the bargaining... He does that, for sure. He knows when I'm serious but, when he thinks there might be a chance of getting his way, he bargains for all he's worth. The "fine, you win" is too perfect. 

 

Iorveth is always giving me the feeling that he understands more than I give him credit for. That dog plays me like a freaking fiddle. He doesn't counter surf but he will go into the kitchen and sniff the edges of the counter (he's not quite tall enough to reach the top) and I don't want that to turn into counter surfing so I get on him when he does it. They were blocked from the kitchen of our old house but this house is set up so that it just can't be done. Last night, I caught him at it and got on him and, with body language alone, he had me running from the room because I was THIS close to forgiving him and undoing all of the scolding I had just done. He knows how to hold his ears, wag his tail, look up at me with the hound dog eyes that Buck probably taught him, and side up to me just in the right way to make me melt. It's ridiculous. 

He is, by no means, a bad dog. He is VERY easy to live with and I know exactly what he's asking or telling me without much thought. He rarely gets into trouble and even then, it's normally nothing really wrong. He communicates very well and there is a reason he is my favorite dog out of every one I have ever had. You know, I've really never had a dog that communicates with me as clearly as he does.

When Iorveth was just a few months old, we had a woman approach us to ask about him. Of course, the conversation led to more than just him and she wanted to know about the breed in general. When I mentioned the word "primitive", she touched my arm and said, "Oh, I know exactly what you mean about he primitive breeds. I have Cocker Spaniels and they are JUST like Xolos!" I tried to explain myself better but she was too busy talking about her Cockers and didn't hear another word I said. Nice woman, just didn't get what I meant, I guess.

The Chessies I have had the pleasure of being around are very businesslike. They can be fun and goofy like Labs and Goldens but they know when there's a job to do. I think the hard part is that most of what so many people have to judge the common retrievers by is the BYB dogs. I have met a handful of very well bred Labradors and Goldens and they were very dignified and knew their jobs well. It seems to me that Chessies seem very much that way because you don't have the huge surplus of BYB Chessies like you do with the others. Hands down, though, Chessies are my favorite Retriever. 



#20
TRDmom

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Pa Gaw is like that... communicates well so I usually know what he wants, including what he's not supposed to have. My boxer would sometimes look at me and whine, so I knew she wanted something, but it was hard to understand what she wanted (potty? food? attention?). It took some guessing and I wasn't always sure that's what she really was asking for. Pa Gaw will be like, "hmmm, that smells really good. If you can't eat all of it, just let me know and I can help. No problem! Really!" One day he wanted on the futon, but everytime he started to get up on it I would tell him "off." After a few tries, he decided maybe backwards would be better. I looked and saw him with his back feet up on the futon, his front feet in the floor. He froze and looked like "oh, no! You saw me." I told him to get off... but I really had to hand it to him. The ingenuity! LOL I know he sleeps on it at night, but I don't want him to get possessive of it so it's not allowed during the day (if I see it).

 

I have seen some very nice Labs and Goldens, but so many today do not have the hunt instinct anymore. Even responsible breeders can produce dogs without strong instincts they were originally bred for when their intent is for showing/pets. If I got a retriever, I would go with a dog from hunting lines. The dogs from hunting lines generally have the temperament and build that I prefer. As for when we get another dog... who knows. Maybe another year or two??






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