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Dental Benefits

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31 replies to this topic

#21
jagger

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Sorry to hear about Dude, never easy to lose a family member.


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#22
zippereatsraw

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the main reason I switched to pmr was I couldn't justify shelling out $400-$500 on a dental cleaning!!! its only been a few weeks but Im excited to see results and Im also looking forward to the vets reaction!!!


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#23
naturalfeddogs

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Don't expect the vet to have a good reaction. Get ready for a lot of "scare" tactics.



#24
jagger

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Don't expect the vet to have a good reaction. Get ready for a lot of "scare" tactics.

 

Exactly... Brought the pup to a new vet, thought she would be different. When she gave him the once over, the couldn't believe how white his teeth were, how soft his coat was. When she found out we were raw feeding, she turned tail and started pushing her science diet. Sigh.



#25
Iorveth

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You know, at this point, I'm kind of over the whole vet reaction thing. We're both confident enough in feeding this way, especially since we've already had a wonderful vet that supports it that we can pretty much steamroll over what a potential new vet might say. DH dealt with an ignorant vet the other day. It sounded like the guy wasn't a very knowledgeable vet anyhow (completely missed the fact that Buck's ears were both infected and very sensitive...), but he tried to scare DH.

 

Just remember that the vet does work for you. Vet hunting is hard and I'm NOT looking forward to doing that in two years (unless I want to shell out the big bucks to go to our vet's civilian practice off base), but, if you and a vet butt heads you can take your business elsewhere. Personally, if it were me leaving a vet I would let them know (civilly) that it was their intolerance that made me leave. Vets need to understand that raw feeding is becoming more and more popular and, if they want to be able to understand their clients and their client's dogs' diet, they need to learn about that diet. 


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#26
zippereatsraw

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The problem when it comes to vets and nutrition is they don't get a lot of instruction on canine nutrition except for what the big name commercial dog food companies tell them. There's an illustration on the wall at my vets clinic describing the benefits of corn, grains, and soy, its from Royal Canin which is the brand that is all over the walls in the waiting room. I will never feed kibble again!!! I don't care what I have to do in order to continue. I'm even trying to convince everyone I know to switch to raw!

 

I honestly don't have a lot of faith in Vets in general just because a lot of what they do is guess work,  trial and error!!! Why would I pay a butt load of money to someone else when for the most part I can figure it out for myself? 

 

The last time I had Zipper at the vet was for his heart worm prevention and wellness check, and the Vet Tech started pushing the kennel cough vaccine on me, brought out the scare tactics and everything, My response to her was im trying to reduce the chemical load on my dog not increase it!!! And that was the end of that conversation.



#27
Iorveth

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The problem when it comes to vets and nutrition is they don't get a lot of instruction on canine nutrition except for what the big name commercial dog food companies tell them. There's an illustration on the wall at my vets clinic describing the benefits of corn, grains, and soy, its from Royal Canin which is the brand that is all over the walls in the waiting room. I will never feed kibble again!!! I don't care what I have to do in order to continue. I'm even trying to convince everyone I know to switch to raw!

 

I honestly don't have a lot of faith in Vets in general just because a lot of what they do is guess work,  trial and error!!! Why would I pay a butt load of money to someone else when for the most part I can figure it out for myself? 

 

The last time I had Zipper at the vet was for his heart worm prevention and wellness check, and the Vet Tech started pushing the kennel cough vaccine on me, brought out the scare tactics and everything, My response to her was im trying to reduce the chemical load on my dog not increase it!!! And that was the end of that conversation.

 

Oh, most of us here know about how vets are taught about nutrition, believe me! Ha. I don't, however, think that it's any excuse not to educate themselves on something that they are going to be dealing with in more and more clients. Just because you are taught something, doesn't make it right, especially when it's so obviously biased. I was taught that, when your dog's nails grew too long, you just cut through the quick to get them back to normal. Sure, that's ideal for a dog who's dealing with curled under nails or nails that are severely impacting their skeletal system, but the average pet dog with longer nails is far better off with his nails being ground down little by little and letting the quick recede on its own. My mom was taught that, when her horse puffed up while she was tightening the cinch, to knee him in the gut to get him to suck his gut back in. It was common when she was a kid. Now we all know that simply walking a horse around for a minute or two is all it takes for them to relax so you can tighten the cinch before climbing on.

 

We were all taught things that were wrong, even in school sometimes. There is much that we are all taught in our history classes that is wrong. It is what we are taught in school, yes, but educating yourself from other sources will show you that much is left out and changed to sound better. In history, the victor writes the story. I was even taught how to reverse a car the wrong way. My first instructor had me looking forward more often than I was looking behind me in the direction I was traveling. 

The moral of the story is that I think vets need to stay on top of things like this, especially since they are going to be seeing it more and more. I am lucky in that our vet is a raw feeding vet and we discovered that quite by accident. We only went to the clinic because it was the on base clinic. Our first visit was with one of the Army veterinarians and she was pushy about neutering and tried the scare tactics. We still fed kibble at that point. We happened to get our current vet on the second visit (first visit after starting raw) when we brought our new Bluetick pup home and when she asked us what we fed, I said that we feed raw and she said, "Good!" and that was that. Other than last weekend we have made sure to go to her every time. 



#28
zippereatsraw

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i agree that most vets should educate themselves more on canine and feline nutrition!! Its totally inexcusable to just go by what you were taught 10, 20 or 30 years ago! "dog" or "cat" food is a relatively new thing, what do they think dogs and cats ate before the invention on dry kibble?  they ate what the humans ate!!!


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#29
Iorveth

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That's my point exactly! It actually makes me unreasonably frustrated to think that people think dogs and cats are "supposed" to eat kibble. EVERYTHING has a natural food source. I own a breed of dog that still lives on the edges of tiny villages in the remote parts of Mexico. They hunt and live off of whatever they get from the villages. They are one of the healthiest breeds out there because they are one of those that are still close to their roots. I was actually shocked to find out that, among Xolo owners, raw isn't shunned or questioned. SO many Xolo owners feed raw. My mind was blown when raw feeding came up casually in conversation time and time again from many different people. 


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#30
zeusthedapple

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2yo Chihuahua. He's been on raw for a little over 2 months now. Just a couple weeks ago, I bought him some lamb trotter bones to help with cleaning his teeth. His last owners fed him Old Yeller, so you can imagine I have a lot of work to do as far as dental hygiene. His teeth get whiter with each passing day, however he has some gunk on the very top of his canines, near the gums. Will that slowly go away as I continue, or is that a harder spot to reach? Should I brush his teeth to help with the process? (I do have a toothbrush and appropriate paste, he does a great job with brushing). Any advice? Thanks!

 

Also, I've been adding kelp to his meals once or twice a week to help with the build up.



#31
Iorveth

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2yo Chihuahua. He's been on raw for a little over 2 months now. Just a couple weeks ago, I bought him some lamb trotter bones to help with cleaning his teeth. His last owners fed him Old Yeller, so you can imagine I have a lot of work to do as far as dental hygiene. His teeth get whiter with each passing day, however he has some gunk on the very top of his canines, near the gums. Will that slowly go away as I continue, or is that a harder spot to reach? Should I brush his teeth to help with the process? (I do have a toothbrush and appropriate paste, he does a great job with brushing). Any advice? Thanks!

 

Also, I've been adding kelp to his meals once or twice a week to help with the build up.

 

For the dog in the OP, I didn't really do anything special. I used my fingernail to chip thicker pieces off that looked ready to come off, but the bones did the hard work. Had I just left them alone 100%, they would have come clean on their own anyway. What you want to do is make eating hard for him. Force him to use ALL of those teeth. It's hard work, but so many dogs get both a mental and physical workout from complex meals and enjoy doing it. I like necks for teeth cleaning. My smallest is 60 lbs so we of use bigger things like lamb/goat/pork necks, but I've seen even turkey necks suggested for small dogs. Mine are big enough to just crunch right through their turkey necks, but even that as their regular bone source helps keep plaque buildup down. 

The tops of the canines are where all of my raw fed dogs (2 living and the dog in the photos above who passed on this summer) seem to collect buildup and I think it's because the bulk of the work goes to those big carnassial teeth in the back. The reason I like big, meaty necks is because there are all kinds of nooks and crannies that they have to pick and and they end up utilizing every tooth. When my Xolo was a baby, we used to give him a whole turkey carcass and let him eat a meal's worth of food off it every time we handed it to him and that made him work hard too once he got the bulk of the meat off and was left with the bony parts. Anything you can think of, really, that will make him use all of those teeth.


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#32
zeusthedapple

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For the dog in the OP...

Will do, thank you so much!! :)


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