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Interested In Raw Diet For 5 Year Old Dog

beginner 5yearold raw

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5 replies to this topic

#1
jordansmom0915

jordansmom0915

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Hi everyone!

 

So I have been reading some articles and have printed out the start guide but I still have some questions that I hope some of you will be able to answer:

 

1. Is grocery store meat okay for dogs or would I have to buy meat from a local meat market. (I usually buy meat from Shoprite or Costco)

 

2. Is it okay to wash and/or boil meat before feeding them to my dog? It might be a silly question, but I want to make sure since the start guide and the recipes I've saved does not mention washing or boiling to get rid of the blood or other things.

 

3. While feeding meats such as drumsticks or chicken quarters, should I leave the bone inside the meat? Can I use the bone as a treat?

 

4. To prevent my dog from picking up the meat from his bowl to the floor or his bed, should I cut the meat in small pieces? 

 

 

I believe these are all the questions I have now. If i come up with any more after browsing more articles I'll certainly post them here. Thank you for taking the time to read this!



#2
naturalfeddogs

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1. Grocery store meat is just fine. I feed mostly that to mine. Just look for the lowest sodium levels you can find. If you have a local butcher or meat market, that's great too!

 

2.No need to wash, and no need to boil. Boiling it isn't raw anymore, and the more cooking of any kind that is done, the more nutrition gets cooks out. If there is blood, it's just part of raw meat.

 

3 Leave the bone in. Bone not only has nutrition like calcium and other minerals needed in the diet, but it also helps to keep the poops firm. It will also be a fantastic toothbrush! For treats, I would use some dehydrated boneless meats or organs. Save the bone for beneficial mealtime chewing. 

 

4. The larger the cuts of meat, the better. It gives mental stimulation chewing, and helps prevent gulping. It would be best to teach the dog to eat only in a certain area on a towel, or in a crate if you don't want it to potentialy be drug around.



#3
GimMom

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Welcome to the board! Did you read the Getting Started guide? It'll tell you how to transition your dog.

 

1) Yes, grocery store meat is fine, just make sure that the sodium levels are under 100mg per 4 oz serving. I source my meats from grocery stores, Asian/Mexican/Indian grocery stores, and placing ads on Craigslist asking for hunters'/butchers' scraps and anyone who is throwing away freezer burned meat to contact me. I usually get hits on those ads and the meat has been upwards of 7 years old, but still okay for my dogs (even my dog with the sensitive gut). I'm actually getting a Costco membership at some point to take advantage of their cheaper prices. So go nuts! The more sources you have for inexpensive meat, the better!

 

2) Washing the meat is not necessary, and boiling it is essentially cooking it, and kills the nutrients that the dogs need from the meat. You don't WANT to get rid of blood, that carries a lot of nutrients for them. There isn't a recipe for PMR feeding, you're feeding a selection of different cuts of meat from different animals. 

 

3) Leave the bones in. They have calcium, and they're integral to the diet. 80% muscle meat, 10% bone, 10% organs. They also keep the dogs from having diarrhea.

 

4) Cutting the meat into smaller pieces leaves more opportunities to choke if they're gulpers. The larger, the better. Lots of people have worked their dogs down to one large meal a day, because it's more mentally stimulating for them to bite into larger pieces, plus they help with cleaning the teeth better because there's more meat and bone to break through. 

 

I baby gate my boys in the kitchen when I feed, since they love to try to eat their dinners in the bed. I'm not anal about bacteria, it's just gross thinking about my dogs dragging their chicken across my pillow, LOL



#4
jordansmom0915

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Wow, thanks guys! I really appreciate it. I found an article on here with pictures of common cuts which is a lifesaver! I had no clue what backs and necks looked like, haha. 

 

For grocery store meats, do you have a favorite brand? 

 

Should I start him out with meat that is not skinned? If not, about around how many weeks should I add in meat with skin? 

 

Also, let's say after the transitioning process I see that my dog likes one type of meat, such as chicken, more than the rest. Can I feed him just chicken meats and organs or I should stick with alternating between different types of meat?

 

 

This is my baby in his favorite sleeping spot lol. He's a shih tzu-poodle mix. I tell people that he looks more like a shih tzu but has an attitude of a poodle, haha. I'll post more pictures of him sitting and standing when I find them. 

Attached Files



#5
naturalfeddogs

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Always feed all the variety you can. That's how you will get all the nutrients needed. If you feed only one protein, you will eventually be very deficiant in many essential nutrients, which would cause considerable health problems. Variety over time is where nutritional balance comes in. 



#6
Prey Model Raw

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The thing to look for with grocery store meat is added salt content, which can cause digestive upset and diarrhea. I don't like to feed anything that has over 75mg of salt per 4oz serving. Read lables....if there's no information about added salt on the label, there shouldn't be any added because it is required by law to have it labeled. 

 

As for feeding meaty bones with skin on, will depend completely on how your dog handles it. Start off trimming all skin and extra fat off, and gradually add it back in by trimming less and less off. Eventually you want to be able to feed most if not all the fat and skin on because fat is an essential part of a well balanced raw diet. 

 

Keep the questions coming! 







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