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Explaining Pmr To People?

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34 replies to this topic

#21
Iorveth

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We had someone ask, "You feed them raw meat? Isn't that a little barbaric?" to which I replied, "Yea, because propping the little birdie carcass up on the grill is so much better"".

I was flabbergasted, to be honest. I'm normally very ok with people's opinions on it but that one made me giggle out loud, something I try not to do.


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#22
Jordann

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I don't hide my amusement. Especially when people are eating meat, but are upset I feed my dogs meat (or even worse, kill the animal myself). My aunt told me the meat that comes from the back of the grocery store is humanely euthanized. She must think I drag it out and torture them?

I don't get the hypocrites, but oh well I'm doing what's best for my dogs and the animals involved. :)

#23
Iorveth

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Yes, the people who have NO idea where their meat comes from and what so much of it goes through before death that criticize those who hunt or raise the meat themselves...

My end goal is to raise lots of livestock both for my own amusement because I love hooved animals as well as for meat for the family and people are often shocked that I could even consider doing that but they have no problem going to the store to buy the pretty, plastic wrapped meat. I wish more people raised/killed their own food. So many are so out of touch with where their food comes from and I think that's why you see a lot of the animal rights extremists. They live in a society where they have enough available to them that they don't have to eat meat and can condemn others for doing so. I have no issue with those who fight against animal cruelty or vegetarians/vegans but the loss of touch with nature is a very sad thing.


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#24
Jordann

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Food, Inc. is a very good movie, really opens up your eyes to things.

I cannot wait to get our property animal ready. Thinking of hitting a livestock auction (after tax time, don't need more on our plates right now :lol: ) and picking up a goat or sheep for the boys.

#25
jagger

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We don't shout it from the rooftops, tend to keep it hush for now. We were at friends over Christmas for supper, brought a raw meal with us for the dog. The daughter is a vet tech, when she seen me feeding raw the argument began, she so believes in her vet's foods. We talked for about an hour about legalities of pet foods, meat meal (mystery meat), corn protein and such. Can only hope she's willing to expand her horizons.



#26
Prey Model Raw

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I would have loved to hear her argument in favor of the doom nuggets LOL

#27
Jordann

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"but Science Diet reps say it is healthy and the vet pushes it, so it MUST be good." :lol: :lol: :lol:
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#28
Iorveth

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I actually haven't had very many bad experiences with other people. The worst was probably the "Isn't that a bit barbaric" guy. We live in an area that is very dog friendly and, when food comes up (which it seems to A LOT) people are generally interested. They may not necessarily be interested in feeding THEIR dogs a raw diet but I can usually point them in the direction of some raw tidbits like chicken feet or tracheas to maybe entice them into looking into it more down the road. People really seem open to learning more about it around here. At least, I've never been rudely shut down when it was mentioned.



#29
jagger

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I think the thing that upsets me most is that we're not "really" following the vets advice. She is recommending a hydrolyzed diet for the rest of his life and most people feel that I should do that because it's the vets recommendation, works for them. Very convenient, and getting people to change their minds on it is like nailing jello to a wall. They just don't want to understand that raw feeding allows for isolation of allergens.

 

The vet isn't against raw feeding, probably against what she is taught but she agrees with feeding the novel proteins. Hydrolyzed will only mask the issue and will probably work, chicken seems to be the issue and if he never eats chicken again, boohoo.


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#30
naturalfeddogs

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"but Science Diet reps say it is healthy and the vet pushes it, so it MUST be good." :lol: :lol: :lol:

Soooo true!! LOL!!!



#31
naturalfeddogs

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We have vet school students come to our clinic regular to shadow us for a day or so. We had one Friday in fact, and even though we are an equine only clinic, since they are in school, the topic of our dogs and their nutrition always come up. Friday, the student and one of our other techs were talking kibble. According to the student, Purina is fantastic and is she said it's the only thing she will ever feed her dog. I was standing right beside them just listening, and just continuing getting the surgical pack together I was working on like they weren't even there. Had either one asked me about what I feed, that's when I would have told them, and we would have gone from there with it. But they didn't, so.........

 

All the vets I work with but one are just indifferent to it, and don't seem to care. The one though, she and I get along fine until that topic comes up. We both just agree to disagree. She did agree with me on one thing. The fact that I don't feed dense weight bearing bones, or knuckle bones. That is the only thing she actually said "well, I agree with that". We just don't speak about that to each other anymore, and wa la! We get along again! 



#32
Jordann

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It's so hard for people to understand why I don't feed knuckle bones. The meat guy at my grocery store is always so baffled why I shoot his knuckle bone suggestions down. I'm on a raw feeding resources Facebook page for my area and people there do the ground/barf/add 5 different supplements to the food. I'm glad it works for them, but they are always so confused as to why I don't give supplements. I've had a few tell me I need to add this or that to their food. I just say thanks for the suggestion, now. lol My vet has finally stopped talking about how they eat. He just says the boys are looking good. :lol:
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#33
naturalfeddogs

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So simple for us to understand, it's hard to understand others not getting it.  


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#34
Iorveth

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Whenever I warn against knuckle bones, I get the "I've been feeding them for years and I've never had a dog break a tooth. I know how to feed them". I want to say, "No, you've been lucky." I bring up Shiloh's slab fracture in those situations and point out other larger bones like necks that can be time consuming and clean teeth really well. 

The thing people don't understand is that, just because YOU have gotten away with something for years doesn't make it safe. Before DH and I got married, I lived with my mom, stepdad and brothers. We had Dude, our Smooth Collie, and Hoss, our Brittany. Those dogs were regularly given the big knucklebones and femur bones from Petsmart and we never had an issue. EVERY time we had t-bone steaks (which was often), each dog got a cooked bone after we'd removed most of the meat and we never had an issue. We fed them leftovers with onions in them and we never had an issue. They even got grapes and we never had an issue. Other than chocolate, we didn't really know what a dog should and shouldn't have. We'd always heard not to give them cooked chicken bones but beef bones were fine. We had never heard no grapes or onions, etc. Hoss ate this way for nearly 18 years and Dude for the first 7 of his life. 

The fact is that we got VERY lucky. Ignorance was bliss but that ignorance could easily have led to a dead or very sick dog.


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#35
Jordann

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I've taken the approach of telling people how I feed my boys and if it gets far enough into what I do not feed, I just explain why I don't feed my boys certain things. My dogs, my rules. :)




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